City of Kobe  » Travel  »
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  • I did it in one full day and managed to see four interesting spots
  • But beyond expectation, they do not accommodate original furniture or paintings, instead other things those may not have any correlation with the buildings such as shop, café, etc. The nearest station is Shin-Kobe subway station, but unfortunately you still need to walk about 15 minutes to the main entrance to the complex and further climb about another 15 minutes to the nearest house
  • With the admission fee of 800 Japanese yen (I think it is rather expensive compared to the number and quality of the displays), you can slightly relax by making selfie with some unthinkable objects as the background, such as being trapped in a large bottle, standing in an upside-down position, sitting in an imaginer chair, etc. Third is Nankin machi
  • Again here you can see foreign architecture of buildings, gates, and park, especially Chinese-style ones
  • You can find stores selling accessories, and a number of rather expensive restaurants


by Pusaka

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    If you plan to visit Kobe to see Japanese temples and shrines then this is not the place for you. Yes, there are some shrines around Kobe but they are not categorized as important tourist destination. Kobe is a rather large city in Central Japan, about 50 minutes by train from Osaka. Depending on what you want to see, Kobe is worth to be explored in one or two days. I did it in one full day and managed to see four interesting spots.

    First is Kitano. It is the ex-settlement of the first foreigners in Kobe. Their houses are still there, many of them are western-style buildings. Among others you can see Italian house, Dutch house, English house, etc. Visiting this place gives an impression as if you are not in Japan. The scenery is very interesting, but the alleys are pretty steep. Visitors should have strong feet and wear sneakers. The houses are converted into museums and open to public with a charge between 500 and 800 Japanese yen (4.50 to 7.50 dollars) each. But beyond expectation, they do not accommodate original furniture or paintings, instead other things those may not have any correlation with the buildings such as shop, café, etc. The nearest station is Shin-Kobe subway station, but unfortunately you still need to walk about 15 minutes to the main entrance to the complex and further climb about another 15 minutes to the nearest house.

    Second is Trick Art Museum. It is accommodated in a small two-storey building near to Kitano. It is best to visit after tired exploring Kitano. There are really not many you can see here. With the admission fee of 800 Japanese yen (I think it is rather expensive compared to the number and quality of the displays), you can slightly relax by making selfie with some unthinkable objects as the background, such as being trapped in a large bottle, standing in an upside-down position, sitting in an imaginer chair, etc.

    Third is Nankin machi. It is the Chinatown of Kobe. It is said that the word Nankin is derived from Nanjing, a city in China. Again here you can see foreign architecture of buildings, gates, and park, especially Chinese-style ones. Most of the houses are used as shops or Chinese restaurants. There are abundant of affordable Chinese food everywhere. Unlike in Kitano, the residents, vendors, and waitresses are mainly Chinese people. In one corner you can see twelve statues picturing Chinese zodiac. You can visit this place only if you like Chinese culture and food as I do. The nearest station is Motomachi.

    The last is the Harborland. As the name suggests, it is a place near to the harbor. The weather is hot during summer, you are better to visit it in the late afternoon or early evening. It is equipped with some restaurants, playground, museums, cruise ship, a shopping mall, and hotels. To me this is the least interesting spot in Kobe as there is no historical site, or traditional Japanese buildings. Only if you have some spare time you can visit this place.

  • City of Kobe
  • One of the houses in Kitano. This area is full with ex-settlements of the first foreigners in Kobe. To go inside one has to pay between 500 and 800 Japanese yen. Since there are more than 20 houses, then you have to prepare a lot of money to visit all of them.

  • City of Kobe
  • The Trick Art Museum. There are some unthinkable displays inside. A few are pretty interesting. But the museum is too small, so I needed only to spend about 50 minutes to explore it.

  • City of Kobe
  • By looking at this picture, one may not know that this is not in China. It is Nankin Machi, the Kobe’s Chinatown. I did not see any Chinese cultural show in this place, but shops and restaurants.

  • City of Kobe
  • Harborland. I regretted to visit this place in early afternoon last June as the weather was so hot. I think this site is suitable for families with young children as there are plenty of child-friendly spots around.

  • City of Kobe
  • An underground shopping street connecting Kobe Sannomiya train station and subway station. You can find stores selling accessories, and a number of rather expensive restaurants. I could hardly any see souvenir shops around.

  • City of Kobe
  • Flower plants are everywhere in Kobe.

    Overall Kobe is a nice city to visit in term of cleanliness, flower plants in many parts of the city, and the landscape which consists of seashore and foothills. Should I have two day to spend, I will visit the maritime museum, earthquake memorial monument, foothills by rope way, etc.



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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2017. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3831071660051231/k2311a0731/7.31.17
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