Hail, Caesar! (2016 Film)  » Movies  »
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  • That's just my opinion but at this point in time last year, we already got the super amazing action flick Mad Max
  • No one would question the quality of Coen Brothers film because they're proven to be one of the best filmmakers out there
  • It's funny because in the film, he was being glorified as a very fine actor, up there in the stars, but his performance in the film was actually kind of mediocre-ish which made the film very ironic
  • Even with having just a small amount of time in 2013's film Gravity, I think he gave a more remarkable performance in that film compared to what he did in Hail, Caesar
  • It just didn't do it for me, and again, I was really disappointed


by Laudemhir Jan Parel

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    2016 has proven to be a dull year for movies. That’s just my opinion but at this point in time last year, we already got the super amazing action flick Mad Max: Fury Road as well as the state-of-the-art thought-provoking animation flare Inside Out. This year we got an intense but shortly-lived 10 Cloverfield Lane, underwhelming Spielbergian-wannabe Midnight Special, as well as a bunch of kids movies that are basically the new mature.

    So in my quest to watch something really good, I’ve come across this Coen Brothers film. No one would question the quality of Coen Brothers film because they’re proven to be one of the best filmmakers out there. But still, this film is a “good but not good enough” film to add to their glorious filmography.

  • Hail, Caesar! (2016 Film)
  • I don’t really think this film tells a specific story. Except the fact that a lead character (George Clooney) of a big Hollywood production was kidnapped and that the studio who produces the film tries to rescue him. I mean that was supposed to be the storyline, but I’ll tell you, it isn’t.

    It isn’t in a way that it has lots of subplots, minor characters, minor details that all sums up to a portrait of 1950’s Hollywood Film Production Companies. It’s not telling a story, but instead, tries to show us what it was like in those old days. Of course today it’s all grand and everything, but in those days, there’s no automatic. All were practical. And this somehow overshadows the plot of the film which became just kind of in there so that it could have a story.

  • Hail, Caesar! (2016 Film)
  • This film has a lot of characters. And they’re not just characters but they’re recognizable stars. Such a shame the movie couldn’t carry its own weight as a whole though. George Clooney was supposed to be the film’s main protagonist (judging by the trailers) but ended up as a minor one instead. It’s funny because in the film, he was being glorified as a very fine actor, up there in the stars, but his performance in the film was actually kind of mediocre-ish which made the film very ironic.

    Even with having just a small amount of time in 2013’s film Gravity, I think he gave a more remarkable performance in that film compared to what he did in Hail, Caesar!

  • Hail, Caesar! (2016 Film)
  • Josh Brolin (the manager of the Hollywood studio) turned up to be the film’s main star, and surprisingly, he gave a great performance. Given the circumstances, he really played the “everyday” man as he was like an everyday man. Going through work, family, religion, and personal agendas, he seemed to do them the way a mature man would do, and for that, I really appreciate his work.

    Other big names such as Channing Tatum didn’t really do anything for me. Except the fact that his musical in a bar was a real highlight, he just doesn’t make any sense. His character was in there without a purpose, and was just there because the film tries to be symbolic especially with his scene in the sea where has was supposed to be “Jesus”, that was really cringe-worthy.

  • Hail, Caesar! (2016 Film)
  • Other surprise came in from Alden Ehrenreich who was really charming in front of camera as a western actor. His scene with Ralph Fiennes is by far the film’s most comedic moment, and I think 2016’s best too. At the end I kept repeating the line, “Would that it were so simple?” and found that indeed, it’s kind of hard. But the delivery of this line was really funny I had to laugh very hard and apologize to everyone in the room for doing so. Gonna give credit to where credit is due.

    There are a lot of minor appearances in this film but none really caught my attention. Judging by the cast this would have been an Oscar contender but after seeing it I just don’t think so anymore.

  • Hail, Caesar! (2016 Film)
  • The film is really artsy and has a lot of symbolic elements which is very typical for a Coen Brothers film. The cinematography by Roger Deakins was also outstanding as always. This man just got everything right. The setting of the film, the look of the film and the feel of the film make it look like it indeed came from the 1950’s. There were also great shots, such as the one above, in which the entire sequence really wowed me.

    The production design was also gorgeous as well, but that’s not to be surprised considering the type of movie this is. Overall, technically speaking, this film hits all the right notes.

    At the end of the day, I’m left hoping I have seen a much better film. It could have been a lot better than it was but alas, the cohesiveness of the film was all over the place. It just didn’t do it for me, and again, I was really disappointed.

    It’s not a bad film, in fact it is a good film, but for my expectations, it failed to be great. I am still a huge fan of the Coens but I really think this one was a misfire. It lacks something.



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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2016. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1114071655140631/k2311a0714/7.14.16
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