‘The Forbidden Zone’ by Whitley Strieber book
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  • Streiber is the man behind the the movie 'Communion', based on a book detailing his experiences with supposed extraterrestrial visitors
  • It's his wild imagination that makes the events in this book so frightening
  • I find it somewhat dry, but I still appreciate the big picture, the way he's crafted 'The Forbidden Zone'

    • by Stargazer
      all reviews
      Whitley Strieber’s ‘The Forbidden Zone’ is the most frightening horror story I’ve ever read. Streiber is the man behind the the movie ‘Communion’, based on a book detailing his experiences with supposed extraterrestrial visitors. ‘The Forbidden Zone’ isn’t your typical horror story, and you could call it suspense, because there are no supernatural ghosts, zombies, or ghouls involved.

      In this story, grotesque creatures from another dimension terrorize an Adirondack town. Three residents, Brian, Loi, and Ellen emerge


      to fight them because they either have to, or they die.

      Streiber approaches this story with a strong chilliness. It’s his wild imagination that makes the events in this book so frightening.

      You really feel that you are in the character’s feet, struggling to get away from creatures beyond their comprehension. This is not classic horror at all, but something modern and fresh.

      One character finds what looks like a black woud up garden hose in a ...


      • mine. She actually clutches it to her chest, and carries it out of the mine.

        Soon enough, this garden hose has grown incredibly long arms with fatally sharp claws at the ends. It’s things like this that make this story so frightening.

        As the town’s people and the landscape mutate, you can almost see, smell and feel it the characters’ sense of dread. Streiber really knows how to vividly paint a picture containing creatures that we can

        barely imagine, making them so gradually fleshed out, while at the same time maintaining a degree of mystery; that idea of what we cannot see in the dark scaring us more than what is in plain sight.

        I don’t care much for Streiber’s writing style. I find it somewhat dry, but I still appreciate the big picture, the way he’s crafted ‘The Forbidden Zone’.

        Some characters could have been fleshed out more, but there is still a strong connection with them for the reader.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2005. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 17191116530230/k2311a1119/11.19.05
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