Heritage Rough Rider RR22B6 pistol in .22 LR
3.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • Heritage is clearly taking aim at the Ruger Single Six (pun intended) with the Rough Rider line of pistols by making guns that look similar and cost a heck of a lot less
  • I'll put it this way -- I don't regret buying this pistol, but it pales in comparison to my Single Six


by HawgWyld

TRUSTWORTHY

followers:2
follow
    One of the pistols that has remained popular since its introduction in 1953 is the Ruger Single Six. That pistol is — as the name implies — a single-action revolver that holds six shells. You can grab one of those in .22LR/.22 Magnum, .17 HMR or .32 H&R Magnum calibers, but the most popular configuration by far is the .22LR/.22 Magnum combo.

    Heritage is clearly taking aim at the Ruger Single Six (pun intended) with the Rough Rider line of pistols by making guns that look similar and cost a heck of a lot less. There are several variations of the Rough Rider on the market, but we’ll be taking a look today at the RR22B6 — the least expensive one of the lot that can be had for less than $200 and sometimes considerably less if you hit a great sale.

  • Heritage Rough Rider RR22B6 pistol in .22 LR
  • Upon initial evaluation, even the box the Rough Rider RR22B6 looks great. You get a dandy graphic, messages touting the “made in America” status of the pistol and a container that feels great and is solid. The question a lot of people must have when examining that box is easy to imagine — is as much care put into the construction of the actual pistol?

  • Heritage Rough Rider RR22B6 pistol in .22 LR
  • Upon opening the box, the user is presented with a spartan setup — a pistol, a trigger lock assembly that’s bulky and terrible and a minimal set of instructions. That gun looks pretty solid, too — wooden grips, a 6.5″ barrel and a substantial weight of 33.4 ounces (a little over two pounds).

    The gun looks good and feels solid initially, but there are some obvious cost-cutting measures upon further inspection. For one thing, the frame and barrel are made of aluminum instead of steel. For another, the bluing appears spotty and sprayed on in parts. Also, there are some gaps in the fit. Finally, this is the only Rough Rider model that’s locked into .22LR — it is easy enough to pop out that cylinder, but you can’t replace it with a .22 Magnum cylinder. That is the biggest drawback to this pistol — it may look a bit like a Ruger Single Six, but the lack of .22 Magnum capability means it sure doesn’t behave like one.

  • Heritage Rough Rider RR22B6 pistol in .22 LR
  • Pulling the cylinder out of the pistol simple — it requires no tools the removal of a large pin that holds it in place. Because this is an “old West” type of revolver that doesn’t feature a more modern, swing-out cylinder, pulling the cylinder out makes cleaning it a lot easier. However, it does take some practice to get good at replacing the cylinder after you have cleaned it.

  • Heritage Rough Rider RR22B6 pistol in .22 LR
  • Because the Rough Rider doesn’t have a swing-out cylinder, loading it takes just a bit longer. How do you load it? Simply flip out the loading gate, cock the hammer back until the cylinder moves freely and rotate it to load it. Slap the loading gate back in place and you are ready to shoot.

    Because this is a single action pistol, you must have the hammer pulled back fully to fire a shell. That is considerably different from double-action pistols where you can elect to pull the hammer back before firing the pistol or fire it without pulling the hammer back. As firing a double-action revolver with the hammer pulled back typically requires a heavy trigger pull that can mess with your aim, I tend to fire double-action revolvers in single-action mode, anyway, so the single-action only status of the Rough Rider doesn’t bother me.

    Speaking of firing the pistol, you get a crisp, consistent trigger and a nice, long barrel that aids in aiming and accuracy. The barrel is weighted well, too, and that feels a little odd. I understand heavier barrels on large caliber revolvers, but on a .22LR? You don’t have to worry about the barrel snapping up too much due to heavy recoil, so what’s the point?

  • Heritage Rough Rider RR22B6 pistol in .22 LR
  • See that red dot in the above illustration? That means the safety is not engaged and the pistol is ready to fire. That’s right — it’s a safety on a revolver. That is unusual enough, but what’s even more odd is the fact that the safety doesn’t seem to do just a whole lot.

    Here’s the thing about this pistol — it has no transfer bar. A transfer bar is a modern innovation that means the pistol absolutely cannot fire unless the trigger is pulled. Modern variations of the Ruger Single Six have a transfer bar, and that means you can carry the pistols fully loaded. Without a transfer bar, it is foolhardy to carry a revolver unless the hammer is down on an empty chamber because a blow to the hammer is enough to fire the pistol. The safety on the Rough Rider doesn’t prevent a blow to the hammer from firing the gun, so what’s the point? Want the pistol to be safe? Just put the hammer down on an empty chamber and the thing won’t fire. The safety, then, is pretty much useless.

    The Rough Rider RR22B6 makes a valiant attempt to look like a Ruger Single Six, but it comes up short. Yes, you can get one a lot cheaper, but it’s not the same thing. Sure, it is a single-action, “old West” style revolver that is a heck of a lot of fun to shoot, but you can’t swap out a cylinder for .22 Magnum shells, the fit and finish isn’t nearly as good and the trigger action just isn’t as smooth. I’ll put it this way — I don’t regret buying this pistol, but it pales in comparison to my Single Six.

    Still, this pistol represents a fantastic value for the money. If I had it to do all over again, however, I’d probably opt for the Heritage Rough Rider RR22999MB6. That one costs about $100 more, but you get a nine-shot pistol that is chambered for both .22LR and .22 Magnum.



0
Mark says :

Don’t compare the 22LR only Rough Rider to the single six, then complain because the RR doesn’t have a magnum cylinder I think you are a Ruger fanboy.

ReviewStream.com
HawgWyld replies :

What? Outrageous Actually, you may be right. However, it seems obvious to me that Heritage is going for the Single Six market with this one. I don’t mean to insult the Rough Rider, but one would be better off spending a little extra money and getting the one with a .22 magnum cylinder. That, ultimately, was the point.

ReviewStream.com
0
Mark says :

re : I’ll put it this way — I don’t regret buying this pistol, but it pales in comparison to my Single Six
Well, if you compare the single six with the cheapest Rough Rider, then complain that it doesn’t have two cylinders, and costs less than a third what the single six costs, and comes up short, quit comparing apples to oranges Yeah, The single six is far and above the RR, but the RR is a great value, and FUN too

ReviewStream.com
HawgWyld replies :

I’m not saying it isn’t a great value. However, the target audience here is the same one that is looking at the Single Six. The Rough Rider isn’t close to it in fit, finish, the trigger or overall reliability.

ReviewStream.com
  • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2016. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1211011652570631/k2311a0111/1.11.16
Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy