Remington UMC ammo for 9mm Luger
  • It's been my experience that a fair number of semiautomatic pistols need to be broken in by firing around 100 rounds through them
  • The trick, then, is to find some good range ammunition -- ammo that fires reliably but doesn't cost a whole lot of money
  • The problem with that ammo is that steel casings don't feed as smoothly and reliably as brass ones and all of that steel-cased ammo tends to leave your gun very dirty
  • Fortunately for me, I know a guy who works at the Remington Arms plant in Lonoke and he has confirmed what I already knew -- great pains are taken to produce ammo that is reliable
  • To sum it all up, this is quality ammo made by a company you have probably heard of, the price is right and you can probably find this stuff at your favorite ammo supplier


    • by HawgWyld

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      If you want to get skilled at shooting and test out the reliability of your gun, heading down to the firing range (or, at least, an isolated spot in the country where discharging your firearm is legal) is essential. It’s been my experience that a fair number of semiautomatic pistols need to be broken in by firing around 100 rounds through them. The failure to properly break in a pistol could, after all, leave you vulnerable at just the wrong time if your self-defense weapon jams on you.

      Ah, but all that breaking in and practice can get expensive. The trick, then, is to find some good range ammunition — ammo that fires reliably but doesn’t cost a whole lot of money. It


      can be tempting to purchase the cheapest junk out there, which is usually steel-cased ammo made by off-brand companies. The problem with that ammo is that steel casings don’t feed as smoothly and reliably as brass ones and all of that steel-cased ammo tends to leave your gun very dirty.

      So, you need something reliable that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg. That’s where Remington UMC comes in. While I’m writing specifically about 9mm Luger in this review, it’s worth mentioning that Remington UMC comes in all sorts of pistol and rifle calibers. It’s as common as sin, too, so finding this stuff is easy.

      So, how much does Remington UMC cost? How about $10 or thereabouts for 50 9mm Luger shells. That’s

      a great price, and the bang for the buck (pun intended) here is impressive. The Remington UMC ammo in 9mm Luger is brass-cased, full metal jacket (FMJ) stuff that fires reliably. That is important because ammo that is this reliable is meant to be fired in bulk so that you can practice as much as necessary and make sure your pistol is firing properly.

      Naturally, you wouldn’t want to necessarily use this stuff for self-defense ammo as hollow points are more appropriate for that use. The thing about FMJ ammo is that is merrily plows through walls and other barriers. In a home invasion scenario, that means you might miss the intruder, fire through a wall and kill a family member. Hollow points,

      • Remington UMC ammo for 9mm Luger
      on the other hand, mushroom when they hit, and that means they will spread out and stick in walls. More importantly, hollow points leave huge holes and put people who are hit with them in shock — that’s kind of the point with self defense ammo, isn’t it?

      So, Remington UMC isn’t great for self defense ammo, but it is great for practicing and breaking in pistols. What you get with this ammo is a pointed chunk of metal that flies out of your barrel at 1,135 feet-per-second and has a muzzle energy rating of 329 foot-pounds. The really important thing, however, is that I’ve not had this stuff jam on a fully broken-in pistol once. That is very important as it let’s the shooter know that there is probably a problem with the pistol if this ammo jams.

      Besides, it is worth mentioning that this ammo is made in Lonoke, Ark. — a source of great pride to those of us who live in the Natural State. Fortunately for me, I know a guy who works at the Remington Arms plant in Lonoke and he has confirmed what I already knew — great pains are taken to produce ammo that is reliable. Remington hasn’t stayed in business since 1816 by making junk. To sum it all up, this is quality ammo made by a company you have probably heard of, the price is right and you can probably find this stuff at your favorite ammo supplier.

+1
DEX says :

Break in a firearm? Preposterous

A shooter should sight in their firearm. Once the firearm is “Zeroed”, it is good. Over time some drift from zero may occur due to normal wear or the shooter’s abilities, in which case the shooter should re-zero the firearm.

If a shooter can’t sight in a firearm with about 20 rounds, either the firearm or the shooter has problems that need to be addressed. Needlessly burn 100 rounds through a firearm to “break it in”? Preposterous

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DEX says :

re : It’s been my experience that a fair number of semiautomatic pistols need to be broken in by firing around 100 rounds through them
You may have limited experience with firearms or you are selling ammunition

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DEX says :

re : The trick, then, is to find some good range ammunition — ammo that fires reliably but doesn’t cost a whole lot of money
If a shooter is sighting in a firearm, the shooter should be shooting the ammunition the shooter intends to shoot when hunting or target shooting.

If a shooter is sighting in with "good range ammunition — ammo that fires reliably but doesn’t cost a whole lot of money", where will the shooter’s bullet be hitting when it is time to drop that trophy elk?

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DEX says :

re : The problem with that ammo is that steel casings don’t feed as smoothly and reliably as brass ones and all of that steel-cased ammo tends to leave your gun very dirty
When a firearm is fouled, clean it - regardless of whether the shooter is firing steel or brass cased ammunition

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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2015. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1227111651661230/k2311a1127/11.27.15
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