Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
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  • I love these little guns because you can pick up a Hi-Point in your favorite caliber (.380 ACP, 9mm,.40 S&W or
  • Some people call these ugly, but I prefer to think of these striker-fired pistols as utilitarian
  • A major complaint I have is that this gun is big enough for a double-stack clip that could hold about 17 shots, but there is no such thing available for the pistol
  • The design is very simple, and it also comes with the benefit of reducing recoil considerably
  • I paid $159 for the pistol, $17 for the textured grips and $88 for a laser site -- around $274 for a pistol that is reliable and stays in my nightstand in case someone breaks in my home and starts trouble


by HawgWyld

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    There are plenty of people who strongly dislike Hi-Points line of very affordable pistols. I love these little guns because you can pick up a Hi-Point in your favorite caliber (.380 ACP, 9mm, .40 S&W or .45 ACP) for less than $200. These American-made pistols represent true bang for the buck (pun intended) as they are reliable and come with a lifetime warranty that follows the gun. That’s right — if anything breaks, Hi-Point will repair or replace the pistol with no questions asked.

    Truly, the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms means that anyone should be able to get a gun if they want one without regard to price. For people on a budget or for people who just like saving money, the Hi-Point is well worth researching.

    Today, we’re taking a look at the C9. If you are going to use a Hi-Point for concealed carry, you are stuck with either the C9 or the .380 model as the Hi-Points chambered for .40 S&W or .45 ACP or too big to conceal.

  • Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
  • Here it is — the Hi-Point C9 in all of its glory. Some people call these ugly, but I prefer to think of these striker-fired pistols as utilitarian. They are blocky and solid rather than sleek and attractive, but they get the job done. Each Hi-Point C9 comes with an 8-shot clip, but you can opt for an extended, 10-shot magazine.

    Oh, and a great thing about these pistols is there are some great accessories available for cheap. My Hi-Point pictured here has custom, textured grips from Hi-Point ($17) and a LaserLyte laser ($88).

    A major complaint I have is that this gun is big enough for a double-stack clip that could hold about 17 shots, but there is no such thing available for the pistol. That’s a shame.

  • Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
  • If you like customizing pistols, here’s a tip — grab some nail polish and non-acetone fingernail polish remover. Notice how the lettering is white on the pistol pictured above. Hi-Points come with the lettering and logo stamped into the pistol, but you can bring that stuff out by painting it with fingernail polish (I used white, but get what you want), letting it dry and then stripping off the excess with the polish remover.

    The whole process takes about 15 minutes, and really adds a little “pop” to a very plain looking pistol.

    Of course, you might have to put up with some stares if you are a man carrying some nail polish through Walmart or somewhere, but the results are worth it.

  • Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
  • The gun might not be pretty, but it feels great in your hand. Sure, you can fire this with one-hand if you want, but the grip is long enough that a traditional, two-handed stance is comfortable. The extended grip on the bottom of the magazine is great, too, because it leads to better control of the pistol.

    Shooting these guns is comfortable, too. These are blowback guns, meaning that the slide has to be heavy enough to stay in position until the pressure from the round builds up enough to force it open, kick out a shell casing and chamber a new bullet. The design is very simple, and it also comes with the benefit of reducing recoil considerably. Less recoil due to the top-heavy pistol means that follow up shots are easier and the gun doesn’t buck too much.

    One thing that is not comfortable about this gun is that there is no “beaver tail” to clearly separate the slide from the grip. If you don’t hold the pistol right, you could lose a bit of skin on your hand when the slide flies back. Here’s a word of advice — watch your hand position carefully when you first fire this pistol so as to avoid getting bitten by that slide.

  • Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
  • One great feature of this pistol is that the slide is held open after the last round is fired. That means you now when you’re out of bullets (important to know in a combat situation) and you can slap in a new clip in a hurry (also important in a combat situation).

    Another great feature? The fixed, 3.5″ barrel. A fixed barrel leads to greater accuracy, and that means this inexpensive Hi-Point shoots a lot better than you might expect.

  • Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
  • One thing I hate about all Hi-Point pistols is that you have to have a metal punch to take them apart for cleaning. The punch is used to knock out a pin, which is necessary for taking the gun apart.

    That process doesn’t take long, but that means field stripping this gun is impossible unless you happen to have a punch and hammer with you.

    On the plus side, this pistol is easy to take apart and put back together. There are also few moving parts to fall out and frustrated you when you take the gun apart. There is one spring that can get away from you and fly across the room, but you’ll figure out how to deal with that soon enough.

  • Hi-Point C9 9mm semiautomatic pistol
  • The C9 (middle) compared to the Bersa Thunder 380 (bottom, and my favorite pistol for concealed carry) and the Hi-Point 40sw (top).

    Here’s why I say the C9 isn’t a bad carry gun. It weighs 29 ounces and is 6.75″ long. Compare that to the Bersa Thunder, which weighs 20 ounces and is 6.61″ long. We’re talking about unloaded weights, but you can see that the C9 isn’t that much larger than the Bersa Thunder, plus you get a 9mm round — considerably more powerful than the .380 ACP in the Bersa.

    Of course, no one in his right mind would consider carrying the 40sw. That monster weight 35 ounces and 7.75″ long — miserable to carry for long periods of time.

    A couple of Hi-Point C9 features I like is that you get a decent safety that is a bit awkward but easy to use once you get used to it and you can peek in the chamber to see if a round is in there and ready to go.

    Now, you want a reliable carry gun and the C9 has proven itself very reliable to me. Some people have said that hollow point ammo does not work well in this gun, but I have had great luck with Hornady Critical Duty rounds and those are fantastic for self defense as they mushroom nicely and hit with plenty of force. I will suggest to you, however, that this is not a gun you should expect to work right out of the box. Run about 200 target rounds through it to break it in and the gun will give you no trouble after that so long as you take good care of it.

    Do not listen to people who tell you to avoid Hi-Point pistols. My Hi-Point C9 (and all of my Hi-Point guns, really) has been very reliable and the price was great. I paid $159 for the pistol, $17 for the textured grips and $88 for a laser site — around $274 for a pistol that is reliable and stays in my nightstand in case someone breaks in my home and starts trouble. That’s a great price for a reliable pistol that can save your life.



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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2015. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1219101650441131/k2311a1019/10.19.15
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