Hi-Point Model JHP .45 ACP pistol
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  • If you do have a problem with the pistol, it is probably a magazine issue
  • In all of my Hi-Points, the magazines were cursed with ridiculously strong springs when they were new, and the solution to that problem was to load them fully and let them just sit for a couple of weeks
  • While a lot of semi-automatic pistols have a dove tail clearly designed to keep your hands in a position where you will avoid coming in contact with the slide, there is no such feature on a Hi-Point
  • Having mentioned the bad points, I should again stress that I really like these pistols and have purchased three of them
  • I know I mentioned that, but I can't stress the importance of price enough


    • by HawgWyld

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      If you want to spark some controversy among people who are enthusiastic about pistols, just mention the name “Hi-Point” and you will find plenty of both positive and negative opinions about those affordable, American-made guns. Hi-Point makes both a full line of carbines and pistols (the pistols are in .380 ACP, 9mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP calibers, whereas the carbines only come in 9mm .40 S&W and .45 ACP). The pistols are dirt cheap (the Model JPH 45 lists for $199.99 but you can usually find them for less) and actually work very well.

      These guns work so well, in fact, that I have purchased the Model JHP as well as the Model C-9 (9mm) and Model JCP (.40 S&W). Before getting into the merits of the JHP 45, let me mention a few negative things about Hi-Points.

      First of all, it is reportedly rare for this things to work right out of the box. While my C-9 gave me the most trouble, all of these guns had to be broken in before they became reliable. Breaking in a pistol involves putting about 100 rounds through it until it loosens up enough to feed and inject shells reliably. In spite of what you might read, don’t go physically fooling around with your Hi-Point until you’ve been through that break-in period. It might be tempting to strip the black paint off your feed ramp or attack your magazine with a pair of pliers so it might feed more reliably, but go through that break-in period first. If you have problems after running 100 or, perhaps, even 200 rounds through the pistol, then you can worry about tweaking the gun.

      Second, the magazines for this pistols are awful. Just plain terrible. If you


      do have a problem with the pistol, it is probably a magazine issue. In all of my Hi-Points, the magazines were cursed with ridiculously strong springs when they were new, and the solution to that problem was to load them fully and let them just sit for a couple of weeks. That weakened the springs enough to allow them to feed bullets reliably. On one of my magazines, I had to get a pair of pliers and spread out the feed lips just a bit so bullets wouldn’t hang on them.

      Third, the magazines are only single-stack. While a lot of similarly-sized pistols have double-stack magazines that hold a lot of bullets, Hi-Points are more restrictive. The JHP 45 holds nine. That’s fine for a .45 pistol, but it gets ridiculous with the C-9 which comes standard with an 8-round clip (a similarly sized Glock might hold 15 shells).

      Fourth, these guns are as ugly as homemade sin. I read a review of Hi-Points once that suggested it is a good idea to shoot these pistols in the dark or with your eyes closed so you won’t have to look at them. There is a bit of wisdom there. To make matters worse, the .45 ACP and .40 S&W models look a lot like power drills due to the thick, plastic plate on the end of the magazines.

      Fifth, these guns are big and heavy. Planning on getting a Hi-Point for concealed carry? Good luck hiding one of those things. The JHP 45 is 35 ounces unloaded and that weight bumps up considerably when pistol is fully loaded with .45 ACP shells. The barrel length on the JHP 45 is 4.5″ — the point is we are talking about a big gun

      here. If you can conceal carry one of these things, you are probably big enough to settle all of your problems with your fists, so you might not need to carry a gun at all.

      So, why are these so large and bulky? They are simple, blowback pistols meaning they are a bit unusual in this day and age. The slides have to be heavy because they have to stay in place until enough pressure builds up to force the slide back and allow the spent shell to eject and a new one to load.

      Sixth, it takes a considerably amount of hand strength to deal with a Hi-Point. The slides are heavy, the recoil springs are strong and that means cocking the pistol takes some hand strength.

      Seventh, taking apart one of these guns is not exactly easy. Breaking down a Hi-Point involves beating a pin out of the frame with a metal punch or small screwdriver, removing the slide and hoping the recoil spring doesn’t wind up shooting across the room. That is a real problem because I believe keeping these cleaned and lubed is the way to keep them running well. Also, you can forget field stripping these pistols if you don’t have the right tools.

      Eighth, hand placement is very important. If you don’t hold the pistol just right, the slide will kick back and remove some of that pesky skin from your hand. While a lot of semi-automatic pistols have a “dove tail” clearly designed to keep your hands in a position where you will avoid coming in contact with the slide, there is no such feature on a Hi-Point.

      Having mentioned the bad points, I should again stress that I really like these pistols and have purchased three ...


      • Hi-Point Model JHP .45 ACP pistol
      of them. While they all feel a bit inferior in terms of workmanship to my concealed carry pistol (the dandy, ever reliable Bersa Thunder .380 ACP), I enjoy the heck out of my Hi-Points. Why do I like these cheap pistols such much?

      First of all, that heavy slide cuts down considerably on recoil. I’ve heard it said many times that too much recoil can be a problem in a high stress situation such as a gunfight. If your pistol kicks up, it takes some time to bring it level and acquire your target again. The Hi-Points stay down quite nicely. And, of course, if you are worried about the recoil from a large caliber such as .45 ACP, the gentle recoil from a soft-shooting Hi-Point will be greatly appreciated.

      Second, they come with a lifetime warranty. If the pistol breaks, just send it back to the factory and it will be repaired or replaced with no questions asked. The warranty is even transferable — if you sell your Hi-Point, the new owner will be able to use the warranty, too.

      Third, the fixed barrels in these makes them pretty accurate. A Hi-Point will never be a precision, target shooting pistol. However, you can group shots respectably with some practice and I’m certain the fixed barrel has a lot to do with that.

      Fourth, these do feel great in your hand. The massive size of the JHP 45 means that I can get both hands on the grips with very little crowding. On the downside, I hate the slick, black plastic grips that come on these pistols. The solution to that is simple enough — you can buy custom grips from Hi-Point for around $20 (dig the cheesy boa skin grip on my

      JHP 45 in the above photo — snazzy!)

      Fifth, these are +P rated. That, of course, means you can use those higher-than-normal pressure shells with these. Now, I’ve not used any of those yet because I can get bullets with enough kick without that extra pressure. Think about it — a .45 ACP bullet is enough of a man-stopper as it is. Why mess with something that’s so effective?

      Sixth, the price of these is very low. I know I mentioned that, but I can’t stress the importance of price enough. The bottom line, see, is that you get a heck of a lot of gun for the money with a Hi-Point. That low price and great reliability (after break in) are the very reasons Hi-Points sell well.

      Besides, think about this — if you have to use a pistol on someone, you know you are going to lose it at least for a while because the police will take it and keep it pending the results of an investigation. Heck, you might not get it back at all. Would you rather lose that beautiful, expensive pistol or a cheap Hi-Point? Also, if you are looking for a gun to throw in your tackle box or the console of your car, wouldn’t you like to have an inexpensive, reliable pistol for those purposes than an expensive one?

      So, there you have it. Hi-Points are ugly, heavy and need to be broken in before they work. They are also reliable and inexpensive. I’d say the good far outweighs the bad when it comes to these. They are a joy to shoot and it is great to know that you don’t have to invest a pile of money to exercise your Second Amendment rights and protect your home.




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Mark D Frontino says :

re : If you do have a problem with the pistol, it is probably a magazine issue
Ive never had a problem with my pistol or the magazine jamming during so called breakin period. My JCP 45 and C9 have shot reliably out of the box. I have put easily 3000 rounds through each and have never experienced a jam. You are being a little dramatic about it like its all Hi Points that do what yours did. Most people I have talked to had the same experience as me accuracy and reliability right out of the box.

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Mark D Frontino says :

re : In all of my Hi-Points, the magazines were cursed with ridiculously strong springs when they were new, and the solution to that problem was to load them fully and let them just sit for a couple of weeks
I’ve never had a problem with any of mine. If you use the Russian steel cased Tullamo you will have some hangups. Normally, you will never have problems with them.

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0
Mark D Frontino says :

re : While a lot of semi-automatic pistols have a dove tail clearly designed to keep your hands in a position where you will avoid coming in contact with the slide, there is no such feature on a Hi-Point
You are not holding your hand gun properly. If you are holding it properly, your thumb should not be in the way of the slide coming backward. The Hi Point doesn’t need the dovetail feature. Come on man

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Mark D Frontino says :

re : Having mentioned the bad points, I should again stress that I really like these pistols and have purchased three of them
Hi Point pistols and carbines are good guns and should not ever be scoffed at They are RELIABLE AND VERY ACCURATE Oh yeah, Very well built Made In The USA weapons.

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0
Mark D Frontino says :

re : I know I mentioned that, but I can’t stress the importance of price enough
Whole lotta gun of the price Good deal

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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2015. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1211091648961030/k2311a0911/9.11.15
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