Nanoblocks, Toy
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  • In this 'intermediate' range there are quite a lot interesting options available
  • They're not necessarily the kind of puzzle you'll want to take apart and reassemble again and again, although with some imagination those with a mind for design will find an almost limitless range of possibilities for instruction-free creation


by James Roberts

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    Nanoblocks are what you get when the Japanese fascination with miniaturization meets the Danish toy phenomenon LEGO. First released exclusively in Japan in 2008 the expanding range of Nanoblock sets has now found footing in over 31 countries including the USA, UK and France. The tagline for the product is, ‘the smaller the blocks, the better the detail’.
  • Nanoblocks, Toy
  • Unlike LEGO there is a much reduced range of brick types. Excluding the bases, and forgetting the availability of different colours, there are only eleven different pieces - the smallest of which comes in at a minuscule 4×4x5 millimetres. This size means they are not at all suitable for small children, even though the chances are they’ll be displayed in the shops alongside other children’s toys.

    Even the simpler sets require some patience and dexterity to assemble. Nanoblocks are a chance for adults to indulge their inner child. Although, if you’ve seen some of the advanced models in the range, you’ll see there is the potential for collecting Nanoblocks to become quite a serious obsession.

  • Nanoblocks, Toy
  • The smallest and easiest sets are the musical instruments and animals. With the smaller size of bricks it is possible to create reasonably realistic 3D sculptures. The finished products resemble an effect similar to that when you zoom in too far on a low resolution image and the enlargement appears pixelated but still instantly recognisable.

    These introductory sets are priced around the region of $10. Although not especially cheap they make for great little gifts and once assembled they work as eye catching little decorations.

    Because they are a Japanese export they also come in neat little resealable packages, complete with the original Kanji labelling, which for some reason makes them all the more entertaining and appealing.

  • Nanoblocks, Toy
  • If you’ve received one as a gift, or just purchased one to send to someone else, there is every likelihood that curiosity has caught you and the landmarks range of blocks is exerting too strong of a tempting influence on you. In this ‘intermediate’ range there are quite a lot interesting options available. These are priced around the $20 mark and the sets are typically made up of around five hundred pieces. The instructions are not broken down to the same extent as LEGO’s but so long as you are attentive and methodical they are easy enough to follow.

    Having originated in East there are more than a few very elegant little Japanese castles like Himeji and Kinkaku-Ji to build. More recognisable to European and American audiences will be the Eiffel Tower or the White House.

  • Nanoblocks, Toy
  • Beyond these sets are the fairly large and committing advanced builds that can involve upwards of five thousand pieces. The price goes rapidly upwards which is going to deter any but the truly hardcore. At this point there is even the option to make further investments in LED display bases.

  • Nanoblocks, Toy
  • With their rising success domestically and now internationally the manufacturer, Kawada Company Ltd., is continually extending the range of sets. Existing editions to the Nanoblock family include world renowned franchises like Tintin and Pokemon.

  • Nanoblocks, Toy
  • With a growing fan base around the globe there are numerous resources online if you’re looking to build something other than what is on the cover of the box. They are a little pricey but booster sets are available to bolster your resources.

    Nanoblocks are great gifts and engaging diversions for an hour or so. Once you’ve put them together they don’t look too bad on your shelf or sat on top of your desktop. They’re not necessarily the kind of puzzle you’ll want to take apart and reassemble again and again, although with some imagination those with a mind for design will find an almost limitless range of possibilities for instruction-free creation.



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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2015. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 4630011641320131/k2311a0130/1.30.15
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