Super Smash Bros. for Wii U  » Games  »
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  • For someone like me who had never really enjoyed fighting games for the most part, the gameplay in Super Smash Bros
  • For me, November 2014 couldn't come soon enough because I was greatly anticipating the newest game in the series and I thought for sure that I would enjoy it as much or perhaps even more than the previous games in the series
  • It has proven to be a very disappointing entry in the series as there is simply too much that I don't like about the game, either in the form of changes that was made or creative choices made by the development team and I have a difficult time deriving much enjoyment from my play sessions
  • I wouldn't be as disappointed over the removal of previous game modes and mini-games had what replaced these modes and mini-games been at least as fun, but as I will explain later, neither Eight Player Mode nor Smash Tour make up for what was taken out
  • Unfortunately for me, it proved to be the biggest disappoint so far out of all the games I own so far for the console


by CirclingCanvas

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    The Super Smash Bros. series started out on the Nintendo 64 back in 1999. It was a huge hit both commercially and critically as for the first time, Nintendo’s all star first party characters could be pitted against one another, such as Mario, Link, Fox, Kirby and Samus, on stages modeled after levels and worlds from Nintendo games, like the Mushroom Kingdom and Hyrule Castle. I was one of the millions that was drawn to and spent many, many hours playing the game. It was a unique party type game that was also a fighter where instead of chipping away at your opponents health meter, you racked up his or her damage meter until he or she was at a high enough percentage to knock off the stage. For someone like me who had never really enjoyed fighting games for the most part, the gameplay in Super Smash Bros. really managed to appeal to me. The game was so well received that, much to my delight, Super Smash Bros. Melee was developed as a sequel for the Nintendo Gamecube, and that was a big enough hit to my further delight to justify another sequel, Super Smash Bros. Brawl for the Nintendo Wii, and that too was such a commercial success that in 2014, Super Smash Bros. 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U were both released.

    I’ve loved the series since it premiered on the Nintendo 64. I’ve probably put more hours in the games both offline, and online with the release of Super Smash Bros. Brawl which featured online play, than most games I’ve owned. For me, November 2014 couldn’t come soon enough because I was greatly anticipating the newest game in the series and I thought for sure that I would enjoy it as much or perhaps even more than the previous games in the series. A month now has come and gone since I got the game on release day, and I’ve come to the conclusion that out of all the Super Smash Bros. games in the series, this is the one that will probably get the least amount of gameplay hours from me. It has proven to be a very disappointing entry in the series as there is simply too much that I don’t like about the game, either in the form of changes that was made or creative choices made by the development team and I have a difficult time deriving much enjoyment from my play sessions. It’s not unplayable, but whereas I remember playing the Nintendo 64, Gamecube and Wii versions for hours straight, this entry in the series fails to hold my attention for more than thirty minutes each time I sit down to play it.

    While the core gameplay wasn’t changed much from the previous releases, I feel too much of what worked in terms of content was removed and what replaced that removed content was lacking and disappointing. Certain gameplay modes like Adventure Mode, which existed in Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. Brawl in the form of the Subspace Emissary, and Break the Targets, which has been a part of the series since the first game, were ditched entirely. I wouldn’t be as disappointed over the removal of previous game modes and mini-games had what replaced these modes and mini-games been at least as fun, but as I will explain later, neither Eight Player Mode nor Smash Tour make up for what was taken out. Additionally, again as I will explain later, the way Classic Mode was redesigned led to me not wanting to play through it as often as previous Classic Modes, and the stage builder mode proved to be a downgrade compared to Super Smash Bros. Brawl’s. On the subject of downgrades and the previous game in the series, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U somehow manages to have a worse online mode than Super Smash Bros. Brawl did. A real achievement, but certainly not one to boast about.

    Once again, just like in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, lag is a real issue during many of the online matches. If just one person that’s part of the online match has a substandard internet connection, it will cause the match to lag for everyone. If you live in a household where another person or other people are using the internet for such purposes as streaming movies or downloading files and you’re playing online, then the match will likely begin to lag. It’s a price Nintendo Wii U users pay for free internet play versus say Microsoft, which features online play that’s far more stable and dependable. Worse yet, unlike in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, where you could just drop out of match that’s lagging, you can’t do that with this game, unless you want to risk being banned from online play for a ten minute window. Yes, you’re penalized for leaving a match that can’t be enjoyed due to someone having a bad internet connection. Additionally, you risk being banned too if the game “determines” that you’re unfairly targeting another player excessively. In some respects, the online mode is better, such as allowing for one on one, two vs. two and free for all no items matches, but just as the previous game lacked common features like being able to choose worldwide or regional play as well as a matchmaking system that pitted similarly skilled players against one another, so does this one.

  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features the largest cast of Nintendo characters yet, topping out at a whopping fifty characters. Even still, there feels to be an imbalance in series representation. Although it’s only natural for certain series to have more playable characters than others, like the Mario and Pokemon series’, as those are two of Nintendo’s top selling franchises, when other series’ like Mother and F-Zero only receive one character each, that just doesn’t seem right. I feel the character roster would have felt less lopsided and more representative of Nintendo’s rich history if each series that had representation in the game at least had two characters from said series. On a related note, with so many playable characters to choose from, I don’t understand the need to cut characters that were previously playable in earlier games, like Lucas, Wolf and the Ice Climbers. In my view, no characters should be removed and the development team should first focus on bringing back previously playable characters before adding new ones. That would be the fairer way of doing it, especially for those fans that enjoyed playing as those characters in previous releases.

  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a revamped Classic Mode where you move your character trophy across a board in the direction of which opponent or opponents you wish to fight. I personally don’t like this retooling of Classic Mode. In previous games, there was more variety to the mode. By that, I mean, you always knew there would be one or two team battles, a giant character battle and mini-games to play in between fights, like Break the Targets and in earlier games, Board the Platforms and Race to the Finish. That kept things fresh and fun. This time around, everything is randomized, so no team battles or giant battles are guaranteed and one on one fights are pretty much non-existent and there aren’t any mini-games in between fights. I also don’t like how you can’t set the number of stocks like in previous games whereas here you’re stuck with just two and I also don’t like if you have to use a continue, the game automatically lowers the difficulty setting, something the previous games didn’t do either. I vastly preferred the Classic Modes of the previous games and feel that this one is less fun and more tedious to complete, as well as offers less content and variety.

  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U introduces new game modes to compensate for what was removed, like the Adventure Mode and mini-games like Break the Targets, but the new modes stack up poorly compared to what was done in previous games. One new mode, Eight-Player Smash, quickly loses its novelty. Sure, it can be fun for a bit having eight characters on a stage fighting it out as things can get real random and crazy with so many characters engaged in heated battle and especially if items are involved, but once the novelty of the mode wears off, some of the problems inherent to the concept become more glaring, such as the camera having to zoom far enough out in order to keep all characters on screen, a real issue on some of the larger stages, thus making it hard to see one’s character and items on the battlefield. Allowing for more than four characters on the screen at once can be particularly frustrating in Classic Mode, where now you’re only allotted two stocks, and trying to keep up with what all your opponents are doing can be more annoying than fun, especially if you’re trying to clear one of Classic Mode’s Challenges or clear Classic Mode on a higher difficulty without using a continue in order to unlock additional content.

  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features another new mode, Smash Tour. This mode proved to be immensely boring and tedious to complete. I didn’t feel like navigating a mundane game board with a bland Mii character, spinning a wheel to move and collecting character trophies, power up abilities and items while occasionally fighting opponents. I don’t feel Super Smash Bros. works well with what is essentially a watered down Mario Party format. The sheer number of rules and mechanics of this mode feels overly convoluted and while the randomness aspect of the mode is fine if you’re just playing casually with friends, but if you’re playing the mode in order to clear certain challenges in order to unlock additional content or you and your friends want to play a strategic board game, then the way some of the items randomly flip things around or the way random battles play out makes it hard to plan ahead and achieve victory through strategic planning. The way the gameplay mechanics work too is frustrating because even if you do manage to plan your moves and item usage carefully, one random battle where you don’t get to pick your character and end up in a chaotic match where you lose due to luck or simply because something knocked you off stage without ever seeing it coming, you end up losing some of the stuff you collected. Simply not fun.

  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a stage builder mode just as Super Smash Bros. Brawl did, but it ends up being inferior despite featuring the ability to hand draw shapes on the Gamepad. Missing from this stage builder are some unique pieces that made the previous stage builder fun to spend hours in, like the conveyor belts, ice and falling blocks, spikes, ladders and a number of other pieces that could be incorporated throughout the stage. Additionally, after drawing and locking in an object, why can’t that object later be modified or at least moved around like in Brawl’s stage builder? Why must I delete it and begin again? The way this stage builder is designed simply doesn’t seem or feel very intuitive and far too basic in the sense that it doesn’t let me manipulate shapes that I’ve finished and locked into place. While allowing freestyle drawing through the use of the Gamepad would seem to open up more possibilities than before, it actually results in a more restrictive stage builder mode due to the lack of structures and hazards as well as forcing a person to delete portions of the level should he or she decide that a modification is needed, rather than allow for a means to edit, rotate, adjust or otherwise tweak what was previously drawn.

  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U
  • Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features over forty playable stages and a vast majority of them look fantastic in the high definition graphics the game sports. What’s nice too is these stages feature what’s called an omega version where all stages hazards are removed and the stage is reduced to nothing but one long flat platform, much like Final Destination. This is good for those that want to play a purely skill-based match but still would like their favorite stage in the background while listening to music available on that particular stage. Much like I feel the character roster could have been approved, I feel the same about the stage selection. It was a waste in my opinion to bring back stages that were already brought back in previous games, like Temple from Melee was brought back in Brawl and was again brought back for this game, as was Onett. Kongo Jungle 64 was brought back for Melee and now this game. What’s with the repeats? Why not bring back stages that haven’t been brought back yet? Additionally, why are there two Mario Kart stages, one new and one retro, and two Animal Crossing stages, one new and one retro, but both pretty much identical? On top of that, some series’ don’t even get new stages, like Mother and F-Zero. A lot of poor choices and unfair ones, too, in my opinion, as both variety and balance suffer as result.

    Super Smash Bros. for Wii U is one of the Wii U’s biggest titles yet and probably will be still come the end of the console’s lifespan. The release of a new Super Smash Bros. game has become a big event ever since the first game in the series proved to be such a hit. Unfortunately for me, it proved to be the biggest disappoint so far out of all the games I own so far for the console. It’s hard not to think about Super Smash Bros. Melee or Brawl or even 64 while playing the Wii U version simply because the Wii U version removed a lot of what I enjoyed from the previous games and what it replaced the removed content with didn’t win me over. It’s also getting to the point where there are just so many playable characters now that playing through Classic Mode and All Star with all of them to complete challenges and get the character trophies that it’s more tedious than fun, whereas with Melee, playing through the modes with the twenty-five playable characters didn’t feel like as much of a chore. Maybe too I simply enjoyed that game more due to the way Classic Mode was in that game, and the well-designed Adventure Mode that offered plenty of fighting, but also opportunities for platforming and other fun challenges in between fights. Super Smash Bros. for Wii U simply leaves too much to be desired for me to rate it any higher than any of the previous releases, which is a shame because I expected to love the game. As solid as the actual fighting mechanics are, there are just too many other glaring issues that I have with the various modes of this game that result it in being letdown. I feel that I’ll mainly be sticking with the Super Smash Bros. Melee and Brawl, and occasionally the N64 version, rather than playing Super Smash Bros. for Wii U.



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Nick holtby says :

re : For someone like me who had never really enjoyed fighting games for the most part, the gameplay in Super Smash Bros
The gameplay is smooth and there are different types of battles in the super smash bros wii u. The variations of characters and skills are quite amazing and also the graphics is not that bad and actually good between some of the other games that I played for wii u last year and the year before.

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CirclingCanvas replies :

The framerate is smooth, but that’s because, in part, the graphics aren’t excessively demanding. While mildly impressive for a Wii U game, the game itself isn’t really visually striking at any time, and compared to the Xbox One and Playstation 4, it’s presentation is average at best. The different types of battles haven’t changed much since Melee or Brawl, outside of Eight-Player Smash and being able to use custom Mii fighters. I do agree that the variety of characters and skills is pretty amazing, but sadly, the game as a whole just feels too tedious and is bogged down by an unreliable and basic online mode.

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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2014. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2822121640500231/k2311a1222/12.22.14
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