Sony MDR-1R Headphones  » Electronics  »
3.5
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  • The MDR-1R has a really classic looking design
  • I think the ridges are semi-effective and over the months that I’ve used it, the cable doesn’t tangle very often, which is great
  • One thing that others have mentioned and I have noticed with mine is that, on the detachable headphone jack, on some units of this product, the cable actually swivels and rotates slightly in the jack and makes a noise in movement
  • Unfortunately, this is nonexistent on the MDR-1Rs and it is a slight annoyance whenever the cable is pulled
  • I don’t know if I can recommend either of them but I would say try them both and see which you like


    • by ajtheproto

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      Just like the Sennheiser Momentum Headphones, the Sony MDR-1R are Sony’s entry into the “lifestyle” headphone category. These headphones are designed to be portable, comfortable, and stylish, as well has delivering decent sound quality. I have the silver/brown color, which I should mention is not available in all countries…and I picked it because it looks quite “gentlemanly” (whatever that means). The black and red versions also look very cool but I have enough black headphones so silver was a nice change for me.

      The MDR-1R has a really classic looking design. It has both modern and retro elements to its aesthetics. It looks more cutting-edge than the Sennheiser Momentums, which have a really retro look. It shares design features similar to other Sony headphones such as the MDR-F1, MDR-SA 5000, and the MDR-Z1000 (its predecessor), particularly in the headband and earcup design. Just like the Z1000, it employs a liquid-crystal polymer driver, which you can actually see the driver exposed on the earcups, which is pretty cool, although it’s probably quite delicate as well. It has the same kind of driver technology, though, unlike the Z1000, the MDR-1R is built out of plastic and not magnesium (which partially explains the price


      difference). The MDR-1R is still built quite well and sturdy. It’s not quite up to the build quality of something like the Sennheiser Momentum or even the Logitech UE 6000 (which feels incredibly solid) but the MDR is still a well-built headphone nonetheless.

      Another thing to note is that you get a nice supple detachable cable, which has ridges along the side of it, supposedly to stop the cable from tangling. I think the ridges are semi-effective and over the months that I’ve used it, the cable doesn’t tangle very often, which is great. You get an iPhone remote and you also get a cable without the remote included in the box.

      One thing that others have mentioned and I have noticed with mine is that, on the detachable headphone jack, on some units of this product, the cable actually swivels and rotates slightly in the jack and makes a noise in movement. This is a bit unfortunate. When making headphones with detachable cables, most other manufacturers will put a locking mechanism, which will prevent the cable from being pulled out and also means a more secure fit to prevent this type of rotation. Unfortunately, this is nonexistent on the MDR-1Rs and it is a slight annoyance whenever the cable is pulled. Now, suggested solutions by others have been putting blu-tack or some other adhesive but really, this shouldn’t have been a problem in the first place.

      Apart from that, it’s a nice design. It also folds for compact storage, unlike the Sennheiser Momentum, so they’re more portable and more easily taken around. The earcups are quite large but really supple. They’re very comfortable on the head and about as comfortable as the Sennheiser Momentum. Because it’s synthetic leather, it doesn’t breath quite as well as the Momentums but because of they’re larger earcups, there’s less of your skin actually in contact with the earpads…so its much of a muchness at that point.

      In terms of sound, I think its worthwhile to compare these to the Sennheiser Momentums (yet again) because I think they’re roughly equal in that category. The difference is that the MDR-1R has quite a thick sound…it’s definitely not as neutral as the Momentums. The MDR-1R has a distinct emphasis on the lower mids which gives it a kind of a chesty sound. It also has emphasis on the lower trebles as well, which makes particularly female vocals sound quite ...


      • Sony MDR-1R Headphones
      sweet. In terms of bass performance, the MDR-1R still is not as strong as the Sennheiser Momentums in terms of the tightness or the physicality of the bass but it’s definitely a huge improvement in terms of sound, compared to the Z1000, which despite being made of much more expensive materials compared to the MD1R, sounded more hazy and grainy. With that said, the MDR-1R still does have slight congestion to the sound compared to the Sennheiser Momentums. These may not sound like is as good as the Momentums but the big difference is the sound stage. For these, and I’m not sure if it’s because of the larger earcups or maybe they’re angled, you get a much more wide and relaxing sound stage. You get more of a sense of being inside the music as opposed to having two speakers on the sides of your head. The Momentums still have the last word in definition for that sound stage, meaning that you still get a better sense of where the instruments are on the stage compared to these, where it sounds wider but more diffuse and the instruments are a little harder to place. With that said, the keyword
      here is relaxing. These have a natural and beautiful balance…it’s not as neutral but if you wanted something of a similar sound quality to the Momentums but with a bit of the different signature, here is something that’s not as dark (in terms of bass emphasis) and with a sweeter treble and vocal section. The Momentums can sound very precise but also thin, whereas these will sound a bit more forgiving. That is, the MDR-1R are more encompassing a larger genre scope of music than the Momentums.

      The Momentums build quality and slight edge in technical performance over MDR-1R would justify a price difference. But there isn’t really a price difference. I think, initially, the Momentums were more expensive but now you can find varied prices on both depending on where you shop and the color that you buy. It just depends on where you buy them but they’re both in $200 to $300 range. I would have liked if the MDR-1R had better build quality like other Sony headphones. With that said, the MDR-1R and the Momentums are both great headphones. I don’t know if I can recommend either of them but I would say try them both and see which you like.




0
Manish Gandhi says :

re : The MDR-1R has a really classic looking design
Its Design is very nice. Its colour is Rich Black, which effects like Superhero’s Super Gadget. It has a superb sound effects. The bass effect beats are very heart touching. Overall its a Sony’s great product.

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augneel replies :

I agree. The MDR-SA5000 looks cool as well.

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0
Hariprasad says :

re : The MDR-1R has a really classic looking design
The Sony MDR-1R Premium Headphones are beautifully designed, with a build quality that reaches higher than most competing models. Designed primarily to bring out the best in all types of music, the Sony MDR-1Rs are sonically some of the best all-around headphones I’ve tested, and well-deserving of my recommendation.

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augneel replies :

I think the MDR-1R has its ups and downs, especially when compared to the Sennheiser Momentum Headphones.

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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2014. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 163111639050830/k2311a113/11.3.14
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