Canon EOS 70D DSLR Camera
4.5
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  • The rubberized grip feels right, and the shape of the grip fits nicely in my hands, and even though I have very small hands, I can still grasp it, though it is slightly big for me, but for any normal person, this will not be a problem
  • The default responsiveness I found to be perfect, but it is adjustable if it doesn't fit your needs
  • I have noticed that at events that tend to be quitter, I get less head turns shooting in silent than I do shooting regularly
  • An interesting and nice detail is that the mic input jack does not interfere with the articulating touch screen, useful for when shooting video
  • It is definitely a step up towards a more professional body style for those looking to upgrade to such a thing, and for your money, you'd be hard pressed to find a decent competitor

    • by Gunnar Campbell
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      The Canon EOS 70D DSLR camera is the successor to the EOS 60D and has many new features and improvements. The 60D was a very groundbreaking camera for Canon. It featured an articulating screen, an increase in ISO range, and was the first of Canons cameras to offer full HD video. But, having been nearly three years old, Canon decided to replace it with the new and very much improved 70D.

      Specification Comparison: 70D/60D

      Touch Screen: Yes/No

      In Camera HDR: Yes/No

      Built-In Wifi Capability: Yes/No

      Both take one SD card

      Sensor: APS-C CMOS sensor (70D slightly larger, this is negligible though)

      True Resolution: 20 MP/17.9 MP

      Cross Type Focus Points: 19/9

      Burst Rate: 7 fps/5.3 fps

      ISO Max: 12,800 (25,600 expandable)/6400 (12,800 expandable)

      Viewfinder Coverage: 98%/96%

      Dynamic Range: 11.6 EV/11.5 EV

      Battery Life: 1000 shots/1100 shots

      Now, with the specification out of the way, lets get into my personal experience with this camera.

      Initially, the camera feels very good in the hands. The rubberized grip feels right, and the shape of the grip fits nicely in my hands, and even though I have very small hands, I can still grasp it, though it is slightly big for me, but for any normal person, this will not be a problem. The button layout is in very good relation to the grip. Nearly all the buttons, including the playback,


      delete, AF-ON, AF zone/point selection, and movie/live-view button are all accessible with only the right hand, even the Depth of Field preview button is accessible with the right hand, though it is more common and much easier to use the left hand. Also, all the buttons on the top LCD screen (ISO, AF, Drive, Backlight for top LCD, and Metering Mode) are also all accessible in the same way. The only things that are not accessible with the grip side hand are the Menu, On/Off switch, and the Info buttons, but seeing as these buttons usually are not used too much while shooting, this is not a problem.

      It is in fact quite easy to shoot one handed with this camera, granted that you don’t have an excessively heavy lens mounted on it. The weight of the camera alone is just right, not too light, and not too heavy. It is also weather sealed, and it has proven tough in the rain for me many times.

      The LCD screen is actually quite phenomenal. Not only is it articulated, but it is also a touch screen. The default responsiveness I found to be perfect, but it is adjustable if it doesn’t fit your needs. It has a option that must be touched in order to adjust

      the setting using the touch screen, which is a crucial feature, for I have not once accidental changed my setting with looking through the viewfinder. The LCD screen also features a built-in leveling system, which I’m sure would be useful to some, but for me, I don’t use it much, but it is worth noting.

      The burst rate on this camera is very good, not as fast as some higher end DSLRs, but 7 fps sure pleases me. It is good to get action shots with, and rarely do I find that I have missed that one crucial shot. It is usually fast enough to capture it. While shooting RAW, it can take about 15 shots with 100 ISO before it has to buffer, while the identical settings using JPEG offers 40 shots before buffering. With the RAWs, it takes a little less than one second to buffer one image, the JPEGs are slightly faster.

      This camera has a few different drive modes, including single shooting, high-speed continuos, low-speed continuos, silent single shooting, silent continuos shooting, 2 second delay, and 10 second delay. The silent shooting is much more silent, but it isn’t quiet by any means. I have noticed that at events that tend to be quitter, I get less head turns shooting in ...


      • Canon EOS 70D DSLR Camera
      silent than I do shooting regularly. As expected, the silent continuos is much slower than any of the other continuos drives, but it is still a useful option.

      Other functions that have not been mentions are HDMI and A/V Digital out ports, a cable release jack, and a mic input jack as well. An interesting and nice detail is that the mic input jack does not interfere with the articulating touch screen, useful for when shooting video.

      Speaking of video.. Well, actually, I don’t use it much, and I am not much of an expert in this area. But, what I have found when fiddling around with it is that it is really fun, comprehensive, and easy to use. The continuos auto focus during video allows for easy tracking of objects, and the refocus ability by tapping the touch screen allows for some nice effects when shooting, and believe me when I say that it focusses quite seamlessly.

      Some more final things to mention is the in camera HDR. I have used it and it doesn’t do much to be honest. I would much rather take the time to do it in post process, but the fact that it is built in is neat, and for some it may suffice, but for me, it

      just doesn’t do much. The WiFi is actually very cool. It is easy to share and send photo to your computer, and the EOS Remote app for your smartphone allows you to control the camera from a decent enough distance, though the lag is real. The 70D also features a multiple exposure feature, which I have played around with and made some cool effects with.

      The only drawbacks of this camera is the slightly annoying button that has to be pressed down to move the mode dial. It seems quite useless to me, as I have never accidentally changed modes while shooting. Maybe you could when turning it on and off, but it still seems unlikely.

      All in all, for the price of around $1000 USD, this is a great camera. It is definitely a step up towards a more professional body style for those looking to upgrade to such a thing, and for your money, you’d be hard pressed to find a decent competitor. The only one I can think of is the 7D, but I still think that the 70D is an overall better camera. I went from my rebel T3i to this, and have been thoroughly pleased with it. I’d advise it to anyone looking to make the same move I did.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2014. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 4324061633941130/k2311a0624/6.24.14
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