In the Flesh (BBC Three Drama)
  • While the vampire craze is far from being over, it feels like the new go-to-monster is a bit less attractive and definitely not as sexual
  • While zombies were always a favorite for horror movies (Dawn of the Dead, Thriller), in the past few years they have made a big comeback, as zombies often do (by coming back from the dead)



    • by Tal Imagor

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      Just a few years ago vampires were all the rage in pop culture, especially with everything related to teenagers. It all started with Stephenie Meyer’s series of books “Twilight”, which flew off the shelves, and continued to a blockbuster movie series that starred Hollywood’s hottest young elite. Soon came the very successful TV show “True Blood”, followed by the equally popular “Vampire Diaries”. While the vampire craze is far from being over, it feels like the new go-to-monster is a bit less attractive and definitely not as sexual. I’m talking about the Zombie.

      While zombies were always a favorite for horror movies (Dawn of the Dead, Thriller), in the past few years they have made a big


      comeback, as zombies often do (by coming back from the dead). In film you could see them in the likes of “Resident Evil” series, the “Evil Dead” reboot and “World War Z”. On television “The Walking Dead” has been attracting more than 10 million viewers a week. BBC’s 2013 series “In the Flesh” can’t really compete with those numbers, but it offers an alternative to the ever-repeating “zombie race”. This time, instead of running away from them, we actually get to know them and even sympathize with them. Warning: may contain spoilers.

      The main character of the show is Kieren Walker (Luke Newberry, “Quartet” and “Anna Karenina”). He’s a teenager from a small town who died and

      along with other deceased individuals, came back from the dead and feasted on the living. This, according to the show’s terminology, was called “The Rising”. The viewer meets Kieren a while after all of that has happened and a semi-cure was found. The “Partially Deceased”, as the show refers to zombies, are now being medicated and ready to be reintegrated back into society.

      This new reference to the zombie phenomenon is very different from what we, as viewers, got used to. Sure, the zombie still looks scary and you won’t want to be left alone with him in a dark room, but now he’s actually a person. Not just that, he’s even the leading man. As the ...


      • In the Flesh (BBC Three Drama)
      show is brought from Kieren’s point of view, we get the inside scoop about the life of a recovering flesh eater. The gilt that comes with realizing what you’ve done, the fear of what others will think of you and the loneliness of being so different.

      As Kieren returns to his family, we learn that things weren’t that easy even when he was alive. This troubled teenager was in love with his neighbor, Rick (David Walmsley) and was never received by his peers. To make matters even more complicated, we soon find that Jem (Harriet Cains) Kieren’s sister, was a fighter for the HVF (human volunteer force) during the Rising. This leaves her very conflicted. On the

      one hand, she was in the front line, killing zombies and watching people get killed by them. On the other hand, her brother means the world to her, and she will do everything to protect him.

      This series is first and foremost a family drama. Instead of the suspense and terror we’ve come to expect from zombie flicks, this show might bring you to tears. Maybe even more than once. The plot might be driven from the supernatural, but the actors’ (most of them unknown) performance will make you believe, and care. A second, extended series of the show has been commissioned, to be broadcast in 2014. And very rightly so, as three episodes are just not enough.


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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2014. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1010011624660931/k2311a0110/1.10.14
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