The Fifth Ring by Mitchell Graham (book)
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  • Fantasy novels and movies are some of my favourite especially if they tell the story properly and help immerse me in the fantasy world of the book or movie
  • This is why I consider movies, tv series and books such as The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and Game of Thrones among some of the best books and movies I have watched and read
  • A part of me had high expectations for the novel and the characters who were involved in it, but as soon as I got down into it, I have to say that I was not very impressed with what I was reading
  • The very first reason was the fact that I thought it was a carbon copy of may fantasy novels I had read in the past such as Tolkien’s works which include The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings and The Simarillion
  • I would not recommend the fantasy novel “The Fifth Ring” to fantasy readers because despite some of the good reviews I read about it, I think that it was very slow and lacking in originality


    • by Redtape
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      Fantasy novels and movies are some of my favourite especially if they tell the story properly and help immerse me in the fantasy world of the book or movie. This is why I consider movies, tv series and books such as The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and Game of Thrones among some of the best books and movies I have watched and read. I’m constantly searching for other books and movies of this particular genre to add to the list. This is why it was so strange that Mitchell Graham’s book “The Fifth Ring” sat untouched and unread for years on a book shelf at my home before I actually decided to try it. A part of me had high expectations for the novel and the characters who were involved in it, but as soon as I got down into it, I have to say that I was not very impressed with

      what I was reading.

      The movie is set in an alternate universe that reminds me a little of the one that Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings is set in. The novel is set in a medieval environment where magic and evil are very real and tangible. A map at the front of the novel shows exactly what the layout of the world in this book is, with the Wasted Lands to the left and The Great Southern Sea bordering the rest of the Kingdoms that lies to its north. In the book a great lord, Karas Duren who is lord of Alor Sator, a Kingdom which lies to the very north has gained possession of a ring of power which he intends on using for his evil ambitions to conquer the entire world, and plunge it into an age of darkness, as well as to eliminate all who decide to oppose him.

      On the other hand, a sixteen year old boy named Matthew Lewin from a rural town of Devondale wins a fencing contest and gains that which he later learns is a ring of power as a prize, but his simple life takes a dramatic turn when some men murder his father and then he takes it upon himself to exact revenge on the person who killed him. Mat ends up having to run for his life, joined by his friend and the girl he loves, and as he figures out how to use his ring of power, he eventually becomes one of the things that Karas Duren fears the most.

      There are several things that made me less than impressed about this novel. The very first reason was the fact that I thought it was a carbon copy of may fantasy novels I had read in the past such as Tolkien’s ...


      • The Fifth Ring by Mitchell Graham (book)
      works which include The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings and The Simarillion. This was what I just couldn’t stand about it too, which was the fact that I didn’t thing that the author seemed to have one original idea. I felt like he was literally copying Tolkien’s works, except that he added one or two slightly different characters and then had the gall to publish them as his own. For example, there was the ring of power, which most definitely reminded me of Lord of the Rings. In Lord of the Rings, several rings of power were made by the elves and one of them was used for the power of evil by the wizard Saruman who was under Sauron’s influence. In this book, “The Fifth Ring”, the Ancients remind me of the high elves who made the rings, and then Karas Duren reminds me of the lord Saruman or even Isildur who
      took the ring and became influenced by the evil of Sauron. On the other hand, the character of Matthew Lewin reminds me of Frodo who was charged with the power of transporting the ring to its destruction in the fires for Mount Doom, because like Frodo he comes from a very humble environment and becomes charged with the major task of bearing a ring of power.

      A part from being totally unoriginal and not very creative one thing I definitely hated about this book was that it was very slow to get to the point. I literally struggled through it because of the very uninteresting dialogue and the fact that certain scenes seem to have been extremely long and drawn out.

      I would not recommend the fantasy novel “The Fifth Ring” to fantasy readers because despite some of the good reviews I read about it, I think that it was very slow and lacking in originality.




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Andrew Leither says :

I am vaguely familiar with Mitchell Graham but not with The Fifth Ring. It sounds great and I love the cover that you put with the review. On the other hand, a sixteen year old boy named Matthew Lewin from a rural town of Devondale wins a fencing contest and gains that which he later learns is a ring of power as a prize … and I added this in as well from your review to show readers how I am impressed and need to get my hands on this book.

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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2013. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1711061611440530/k2311a0611/6.11.13
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