Fiverr  » Web sites  »
3.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
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www.fiverr.com
  • Well, that's basically saying it’s okay for people to put you at a disadvantage as long as they can fix it eventually
  • So, yes I think it’s wrong that I get delayed because someone of their staff got lazy and didn’t watch the whole video and just assumed that I was in the wrong
  • That would be a more accurate representation of a good service in my opinion, rather than an all or nothing approach of the thumbs system
  • You can report a user to the staff, but from my experience, the support team will just try to give you advice on how to handle them
  • I can’t say I hate this website but I dislike it for many reasons


    • by Astarus

      TRUSTWORTHY

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      Fiverr is a website that lets sellers offer services to buyers in their online community. I’ve only been a seller and have never bought anything on this website so all I’m going to talk about is the selling aspect of it.

      You can sell video testimonials, voiceovers, graphics, animation video, articles, advice, custom music, website and business tools and anything else you can think of. It’s kind of a freelance job, where you only work when people order your service. You set a time frame and are expected to deliver the service within that time span. It gets the name Fiverr because the minimum you can charge for a service is $5. This is appealing to buyers who want to get work done for cheap. But it doesn’t actually work that way…at least for me it doesn’t. You see…you have a page that you can post your gig/service where you can upload photos and videos to showcase your service. You also get a description section that you can describe your gig. Many sellers use this section along with the video to tell the buyer about the pricing. You can offer a gig for five dollars or you can do like me and provide a rate. For instance, I have a gig for simple animation video and my rate is 25 words of a script per $5. If the request exceeds more than 25 words, the buyer can just order again. This gives you freedom to how you charge. You can charge by video duration, words, time spent, or any other unit you can think of.

      You also have the option to set instructions for the buyers. The buyer can’t proceed with the order until they respond to the instructions. I wish this was formatted into a form syntax that required the buyer to input characters into seperate text fields. Instead, it’s just a big box of text that you type out and the buyer sees and they just have to respond with just anything in their own box of text.

      Gigs are separated into categories and subcategories. This is a good feature because it lets you hone in on the buyers most likely to purchase your gig. But if your topic doesn’t fit into any of the categories, you can just put it under “other”.

      If you offer a good service, your gig could be featured on the website front


      page, which is cool.

      The video submission process is majorly flawed. The purpose of the video is to showcase yourself doing your gig. Basically, a group of staff members review the video that you submitted to make sure you followed their guidelines. You have to mention that the gig is offered exclusively on Fiverr. They also say that the video should be 10 to 30 seconds. I once submitted a video that was 1 minute and 30 seconds and it would get rejected because it was too long. I can follow rules, but that’s not what’s going on here. It’s something that you might call viewer discretion. The staff members that review your videos all see them inconsistently. I’ve seen videos that were over 3 minutes long that were approved and mine was rejected for being 1 minute and 30 seconds. I would also get rejected because, “apparently”, my gig didn’t mention that it was offered exclusively on Fiverr. It did!!! but the staff member didn’t watch the entire video and that’s why they thought that I didn’t mention it. I would submit it again and it would get approved eventually. You might think this is not a big deal if they approved eventually. Well, that’s basically saying it’s okay for people to put you at a disadvantage as long as they can fix it eventually. Because my video wasn’t approved on the first time, like it should have, I lose potential customers who might have seen my gig but needed that extra persuasion to order; persuasion that my video would have supplied. And customers are a big deal because some of them come back and use your service on a regular basis. So, yes I think it’s wrong that I get delayed because someone of their staff got lazy and didn’t watch the whole video and just assumed that I was in the wrong.

      The level system is pretty cool. There are four stages: no level, Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3. You get access to more features depending on what level of a seller you are. The first level is unlocked after you complete 10 orders. Level 2 is unlocked after completing 50 orders within a 2 month time span. Level 3 is unlocked only by being selected by the staff as a “top-rated seller”. It also speaks as a credibility statement when you are level 3 ...


      • as supposed to level 1. This helps distinguish the amateurs from the professionals. The different features unlocked include gig extras which work like addons that the buyer can purchase with the service instead of ordering multiple gigs one by one. At higher levels, you have the option to charge more for these addons. However, there might be some sellers who offer excellent service but don’t get a lot of orders so they might be only Level 1. The system tries to account for this by having a feedback system.

        When you complete an order, the customer can give you a thumbs up or thumbs down. Your total thumbs up and thumbs down are averaged into a percentage: Thumbs up being 100% and thumbs down being 0%.If you have all thumbs up, that means that you must be doing something right. This is a nice feature but I think it would be better if you could rate the seller from 0 to 5 stars. That would be a more accurate representation of a good service in my opinion, rather than an all or nothing approach of the thumbs system. It’s kinda like how the new Youtube uses likes and dislikes to rate a video rather than the old 5-star system. I digress.

        Most of the customers are nice and will almost always give you a thumbs up if you deliver an average service, at the least. However, they are some customers that will be unyielding, stubborn, difficult, and refuse to comply with the guidelines that you specify. They will try to blackmail you and threaten to give a bad feedback comment if you don’t do as they want you to. I can’t blame Fiverr for allow these people to inhabit their community but I can blame them for doing little about it. You can report a user to the staff, but from my experience, the support team will just try to give you advice on how to handle them. In the end, only you experience and witness the perils of the ridiculous customer and you end up paying for it with a 99% rating instead of 100%.

        There’s a request system that lets buyers tell the sellers what they’re looking for. This kinda helps you generate ideas for gigs. As far as contacting the specific users who make these requests, they never reply back to my messages.

        There’s an inbox

        system were you can send messages to other users. There are many times when buyers are very slow to respond to your messages so you have to be patient. The system also emails a notification every time you get a new message. This is kinda annoying to me…if I wanted to check my messages, I would log on, simple. There’s no way to turn it off the email notifications so you just have to deal with your email inbox been a bit more crowded.

        You get paid through Paypal. After you earn the money, it takes 2 weeks to clear before you can withdraw. This is really inconvenient for me. They also take 1/5th of your earnings to pay for the website maintenance and everything else. For every $5 you earn, you keep $4. Paypal also deducts some money during the transaction through its fee system.

        There’s also a forum where you can discuss with other buyers and sellers about the website. Some people spam their gigs there and others try to offer tips to newbies and others whine about what they don’t like about the website or how they aren’t getting any orders. I don’t use it too often and if you can think in a logical manner, all the tips these top rated sellers will disclose are just common sense practice.

        I hear this a lot from other users on Fiverr on the forum: “I’m grateful for the opportunity that Fiverr gives me to earn money.” I partially disagree. Fiverr is a medium. What’s really earning the money is the skills that I have acquired over several years after endless hours of practice. If I didn’t have the skills, I wouldn’t be earning regardless of what website I use. I recommend this website simply because there just isn’t a better alternative for freelancing.

        I can’t say I hate this website but I dislike it for many reasons. I feel similar to how many product sellers feel about eBay. They like it for some reasons and dislike it for many reasons and since there’s really nowhere else to go that offers such a large volume of customers, so they’re stuck with it.

        If you are going to use Fiverr, read the policy and terms of use and don’t get in trouble. Act professional and don’t be cheap. Take your work seriously as a real business but also have fun.



    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in March, 2013. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2022031605670631/k2311a0322/3.22.13
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