Roots Mini Series  » TV  »
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  • BET recently had a marathon of it for Black History Month, and I thought it would be the perfect time for me to sit down and watch it, even though I knew my mom had the complete series on DVD
  • The subject matter is definitely a hard one to swallow especially if you’re a black person watching this for the first time or the fifteenth
  • I think it is a necessary movie to watch just to help start conversations, and to take more pride in your history

    • by C.Channing
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      I am embarrassed to admit that as an African-American I am just now seeing the mini-series Roots for the first time in my late twenties. BET recently had a marathon of it for Black History Month, and I thought it would be the perfect time for me to sit down and watch it, even though I knew my mom had the complete series on DVD.

      The mini-series Roots is based on the ancestry of Alex Haley. It documents one of his first ancestors Kunta Kinte who was born and raised in Africa, and how he was kidnapped from his home and sold into slavery.

      When I first sat down to watch


      the series I honestly didn’t realize just how long it was. The series itself has to be over thirty to forty hours long because it covers the beginning starting with Kunta Kinte to Alex Haley returning to Africa as an adult and everything in between.

      The series begins in Africa mainly focusing on Kunta Kinte’s tribe: his parents, his birth, his journey to manhood, and then his kidnapping. It was an all-star cast of black actors who are presently still working with some having passed away. Kunta Kinte was a prideful kid and relished in the ways of his people, and that pride continued even throughout his years in slavery: renouncing his slave name Toby, always thinking about freedom and trying to escape before that came to an end with slave hunters partially cutting off his foot.

      Then the story shifts to his daughter Kizzy Kinte which means stay put in Kunta Kinte’s native language. Kizzy is befriended by the master’s daughter only to find out that she wasn’t her friend at all when she needed her the most. Kizzy is sold to another owner for writing a traveling pass for another slave, and then she gives birth to a son who is affectionately called “Chicken George”. Until the day of her death, Kizzy always kept the spirit of her ...


      • Roots Mini Series
      father and his culture alive.

      After that the movie tackles each time period for each generation Alex Haley’s family. From becoming free to modern times of Alex Haley’s life.

      There is so much in this movie that you would need more than just one weekend to really grasp the tone and history Alex Haley is trying to provide. I had of an in-depth understanding of black history after watching this movie, and I make sure to read a book about black history at least once a week. I also found a more profound understanding of the significance of keeping the history of your family alive in future generations.

      This movie is extremely

      graphic and violent, and the language alone would make you want to cover your ears as an adult. The subject matter is definitely a hard one to swallow especially if you’re a black person watching this for the first time or the fifteenth. I think it is a necessary movie to watch just to help start conversations, and to take more pride in your history. I think everyone, regardless of color, should watch this because it is very educational. However, this is not the movie that should be watch by young adults such as under 20 because the subject matter is so strong. It’s a long movie but it’s worth the sit down.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in March, 2013. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 104031603460331/k2311a034/3.4.13
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