Celeste and Jesse Forever movie


    • by Brynn Bowery
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      Celeste and Jesse is a couple, very personable; charming. It is an easy to view film due to the couple’s charm. The movie begins well; and just gets better. Celeste and Jesse have been happily married for a long time: long enough for their good acquaintances to view them as one and the same—nearly. However, now the happy couple suddenly decides she will reside in the house; he will move into the backyard’s studio. That said: they mention they will still remain very best of friends: not exactly good words for romance.

      The couple’s decision is offensive and in turn upsets their good acquaintances. This is due to the change such a departure represents—away from the norm. Or, it may be better said, the couple’s acquaintances


      feel very off-center by the change. Happy Celeste and Jesse: If their marital union is unraveling then what does that say may happen within their friends’ own spousal/coupling backyards? Certainly, Celeste and Jesse are duty-bound to stay together as a couple just to keep matters Orthodox—right?

      Celeste and Jesse are played by actress Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg. The actress and actor make for an ideal couple. Andy Samberg of “Saturday Night Live” presents another side of himself as part of this union. It is not so surprising with respect to Jones: she is likable enough to be an enhancement in way of this couple or any reasonable couple.

      The screenplay is well-written. It is written by Rashida Jones and Will McCormack. The conversation between the characters

      is believable. This includes the primary characters as well as the film’s supporting cast members. The audience is able to gain a sense of the characters’ feelings. Sometimes in films, the supporting cast appears like mere props for the primary characters: however this is not true in this film.

      Celeste and Jesse are opposite in style of each other. However, not to sound cliché: that is what makes Celeste and Jesse a good couple—since “opposites attract.” Celeste is very hyper. Jesse is more on the lethargic side. They seem ideal for each other: two peas in a pod—sort of like a talk show host with his supporting side-kick.

      Celeste: the hyperactive character, not surprisingly wants the divorce. She is a woman ...


      • Celeste and Jesse Forever movie
      possessed by ambition. She is enterprising in way of her own future; she is also ambitious in way of Jesse’s well-being. She is extremely idealistic about their marital union; yet she lacks the will to stay with it. This is due to the fact she can easily see herself in a newer improved marital relationship—because there is nothing innately wrong with her current marital union per se. Jesse on the other hand is not bent to think like Celeste. Suffice it to say rightly maybe Celeste has acquired the “seven year itch” jitters: The couple has been married for the last six years with year seven just around the corner.

      It seems the two can go along just fine as best friends indefinitely: especially in the eyes of

      Jesse. However, not to give away the storyline, Jesse is provided with a piece of news which is totally unexpected. The news breathes some reality back into the relationship—especially for Celeste. The easy-going Jesse trumps Celeste’s ambitiousness with the news.

      This is not the template found with regard to most romantic comedies. “Celeste and Jesse Forever” is a movie avoidant of traditional romantic-comedy themes. It starts out very realistic; and introduces an event not at all anticipated within the couples’ comfortable day-to-day existence.

      Ari Graynor plays Celeste’s best friend. Emma Roberts and Elijah Wood also play bit roles as supporting cast members.

      Naturally, Rashida took the prized primary role: after all she wrote the movie—and why not? What better way for an actress to get work in today’s Hollywood?


+1
Kin says :

no story just characters? Not helpful

ReviewStream.com
Dawn Michel ryan replies :

The film is abstract so you are right in a sense. However, the theme is about the characters and their interaction with each other. You see some story lines are just like that some people get a great deal out of the prose that goes on between two types of unique personalities. So you see you are correct in your thinking: however, some stories are just about interaction. Most people do not pick up on that type of characteristic so I think your thinking is very logical and clever–and I applaud your comment.

Thanks kindly,

Dawn Michel Ryan

ReviewStream.com
0
tuliy says :

I see your concept about the hero and heroin, but no movie story not even a little, i do not see until now what this really movie about

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0
Dawn Michel ryan adds :

re : However, now the happy couple suddenly decides she will reside in the house
Hello,

Yes. She gets to reside in the main residence. It appears to me that they wish to be together yet they do not want to be together. I think they are very ambivalent about each other. They need each other but they do not wish to believe they need each other. Some relationships are extremely complicated because the characters do not know how to simplify matters. They may be brilliant with regard to their professions and very ambitious yet they may lack when it comes to their rapport. There are a great deal of built in layers. I do not experience this in relationships, however, that’s the idea of watching great films with interesting lives: you get to experience the ideologies of different individuals.

Submitted by Dawn Michel Ryan

ReviewStream.com
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