Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector book  » Books  »
4.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • I never would have guessed that Near To the Wild Heart was her debut novel, because it's as crazy and terribly spectacular as my favorite which was The Passion According to GH, a meandering, slightly thrilling journey through the author's mind in epic proportions when confronted by a rodent inside the maid's quarters, constructed as if the words resonated with self-limiting retention (Nowness, she herself calls it)
  • I would recommend Clarice Lispector's books to the budding intellectual and readers in search of nuance
  • I've come to this point of appreciating her books in which it's not at all about understanding her prose and quirks, but simply to experience the legend of Clarice Lispector


    • by jhunie

      TRUSTWORTHY

      followers:24
      follow
      Reading is one pastime that allows us to cultivate our personal tastes. Thinking back to all the books I had finished, I began to worry that my general way of seeing things had been shaped largely by male writers. Summed up, I picked up some crude philosophies (Kafka, Camus, Genet), existential tics (Murakami, Latin American writers) and a bulk of my political views (DFWallace, Dostoevsky) from select books written by men. I had stretched my literary tastes to include female writers, but I was stumped where to begin since I knew only few noteworthy female authors who produce great literature. Until I was introduced to Clarice Lispector. I was geeked out after reading a review of her book which drew more interest and intrigue from the author’s life. Clarice Lispector had her first novel Near to the

      Wild Heart published in Brazil when she was just 23. I’ve lately tackled the early translation of this novel from New Directions, the one translated by Giovanni Pontiero.

      Meanwhile, New Directions has released 4 new refreshed editions of Lispector’s novels earlier, which included the book in question, and I’ll be devouring each once I get a copy.

      The more I delve into the author’s slim body of work, the more I’m convinced that Lispector is an exceptional author deserving of high regard among important female writers. Had she made it early in the game, Postmodernism would have been perennially credited to her name alongside the literary brethren. I never would have guessed that Near To the Wild Heart was her debut novel, because it’s as crazy and terribly spectacular as my favorite which was The Passion According to GH, a meandering, slightly thrilling journey through the author’s mind in epic proportions when confronted by a rodent inside the maid’s quarters, constructed as if the words resonated with self-limiting retention (Nowness, she herself calls it). Near to the Wild Heart sets all the craziness of Lispector’s defiant style, a novel only a sage or a genius of language could make and not an amateur. The way she writes has an awkward quality that may offend the syntax-conscious reader, cause a migraine or take you to a higher plane of consciousness. Lispector’s gift of inventing oxymoron and her pun on the most absurd of things imply that there’s still a greater potential for an overused medium such as language to be new again, that not everything has been said yet in literature the way Lispector did. Above all, she invokes words that ...


      • Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector book
      animate or bring the non-being into greater detail while careful not to be seduced too much by the farcical lyricism (”emptiness”) of language.

      Near to the Wild Heart is the story of Joana, split between adolescence and married life. Orphaned at a young age, Joana had to spend most of her adolescent life under the care of a puritanical aunt. Early on Lispector molds Joana, however sketchy the plot may be, into a character who lives inside her brain populated by wicked existential thoughts and sensational reveries. The funny but astute associations Lispector makes with the sounds of her Dad’s typewriter and the omnipresent clock flipped me out when I read the first sentences of the novel. And then the young Joana invents a poem about a worm unable to see the pretty cloud. The adult Joana meditates on

      her complacency and discontent of marriage, much of it dissecting the uneventful.

      Ultimately Joana gets to her primal desire: Solitude… the first time in Joana’s life since living off of other people. Like GH it had a transcendent ending, but which I didn’t like. The novel is full of exhilarating descriptions and beautiful similes. Nevertheless, expect to be confused and even nauseated as the narrator digs layer upon layer of consciousness. It’s a difficult read. Also the narrator (’I') sometimes refers to herself as a man. Just try not to be so dogmatic. I would recommend Clarice Lispector’s books to the budding intellectual and readers in search of nuance. I’ve come to this point of appreciating her books in which it’s not at all about understanding her prose and quirks, but simply to “experience” the legend of Clarice Lispector.




  • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1727091592150830/k2311a0927/9.27.12
Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy