“Patient Zero” by Jonathan Maberry  » Books  »
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  • Maberry also manages to blend modern hot topics in the United States (namely terrorism) with a mix of action, romance, and just enough gore to keep the splatterpunk fans happy
  • Though Patient Zero is hardly light reading, I couldn't pull my hands from the book covers if I wanted to
  • You can almost taste the blood of the zombies as Joe Ledger and his band of military misfits fights their way through hordes of zombies, while also dealing with multiple twists and turns that set them back every moment they seem to gain ground

    • by Rob Killam
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      If I was afraid of zombies as a somewhat legitimate monster after “Resident Evil,” I’m absolutely horrified of them after reading Jonathan Maberry’s “Patient Zero.” George A. Romero doesn’t have much on what I really feel is the up-and-coming Godfather of the Hard Science Fiction Zombie. Romero’s claim to fame was the brutality and gore with which he painted the silver screen; Maberry paints that screen and adds legitimate fear for both his characters and readers.

      “Patient Zero” is a “Joe Ledger novel,” with the series focusing on


      a Maryland police officer who finds himself working for a fictional military task force. Unlike most zombie novels that simply bring zombies to life with some half-hearted excuse, Maberry took the time to bring his zombies to life with real science. Sure, it’s a deviation from the actual Undead theory, but the horrifying part comes when it makes sense. Maberry also manages to blend modern hot topics in the United States (namely terrorism) with a mix of action, romance, and just enough gore to keep the splatterpunk ...

      • fans happy.

        Though “Patient Zero” is hardly light reading, I couldn’t pull my hands from the book covers if I wanted to. With a few keystrokes, we’re given a world that seems so real I could practically smell Baltimore. I could feel the desert heat of the Middle East. You can almost taste the blood of the zombies as Joe Ledger and his band of military misfits fights their way through hordes of “zombies,” while also dealing with multiple twists and turns that set them back every moment

        they seem to gain ground.

        To my chagrin, I have yet to read more of Maberry’s work, though he has a gritty approach that seems well-honed in the fashion of “Fight Club” meets “Dawn of the Dead.” It’s the kind of writing that would go well with narrating “The Walking Dead,” though its intelligent, layman’s approach to the science involved might be even a few notches above Rick and his world. I look forward to seeing what else Maberry has up his sleeve, in all its grotesque, smart, noir glory.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1719061580840130/k2311a0619/6.19.12
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