Kindle Touch  » Electronics  »
4.0
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  • It is the perfect size, weight, and design and has thousands of books available for either discounted prices or for no cost at all, depending if you are searching for a new release or a Shakespearean classic
  • The second problem that may not be noticed at first glance is that the kindle isn't very well equipped to handle
  • Unfortunately the very first book I chose to read was in this format, and was a very difficult adventure
  • Everything from its simplistic design to its matte back to prevent slipping was thought out in detail with the intention of giving you the most immersive reading experience possible

    • by chubbles157
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      The Kindle Touch is the ideal ereader. It is the perfect size, weight, and design and has thousands of books available for either discounted prices or for no cost at all, depending if you are searching for a new release or a Shakespearean classic. Everything from DIY manuals to cookbooks to medical dictionaries to plain old novels are available in the Kindle store.

      Despite its inherent goodness, though, there are a few flaws that need to be worked out. The list is very small: only two problems are immediately found with the device.

      First, the dictionaries equipped with the kindle are very useful as they are, but are used 95% of the time when looking up a specific word while reading a book. The Kindle Touch exhibits the handy feature of being able to look up the word in a matter of seconds without exiting your book, leading to a smooth


      transition back into your reading. The dictionaries, however, will seem to make their way into the general library of books rather than the place they need to be to access at a glance, and need to be put back into your “Archived Items”, a process which takes several minutes. During this period you are not only unable to access the dictionary, but were jarred out of the story and now must continue forever not knowing what the word you tried to look up means. This happens every time you use your kindle, practically– or it’s just me, but I fail to see what I’ve been doing to make my dictionary unhappy with its station in my Archived Items.

      The second problem that may not be noticed at first glance is that the kindle isn’t very well equipped to handle .pdf files. Unfortunately the very first book I chose to read was ...


      • in this format, and was a very difficult adventure. The Kindle tries its hardest to be kind to those reading a .pdf, employing state-of-the-art technology to identify highlighted words by sight and allowing the reader to change the size of the page, but in trying to provide the best it can it has glossed over the more important fundamentals of reading. While a six inch screen may fit perfectly in your hand while nestled up with your favorite story, it is not a proper size to be reading a book on when large margins and unnecessary headers are carried over in .pdf from the printed version of the book. Enlarging the page is an easy fix, but the page must be meticulously set to its original size before allowing you to flip to the next one. Thankfully mine was a short book, else I would have been tempted to simply
        put down the Kindle and go hunt down a printed version. It also has a hard time figuring out what you want it to do. Go to the next page? Resize the page? Highlight a word? You’re going to have to be more specific. This Kindle is just not following.

        In spite of these problems, the Kindle Touch is an ideal all ereader designers should strive to follow. Everything from its simplistic design to its matte back to prevent slipping was thought out in detail with the intention of giving you the most immersive reading experience possible. There’s not really much to say on the subject–just imagine reading a book, but remove every effort involved, from propping a stubborn spine open on your thumb and forefinger to the simple act of turning a page. It’s an ereader done right, even if it still has a few kinks to be worked out.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 167061578980530/k2311a067/6.7.12
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