Braveheart film  » Movies  »
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  • He doesn’t uses complex stylistic directional elements which critics have to decipher-he uses simple visual and spiritual beauty and harshness and nobleness of action-directional tools that make an impression upon the viewer much more strongly than for instance carefully constructed cinematography and an indicative lighting

    • by Svetozar
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      When we think about the Middle Ages what strikes us is a lot of savagery, pain and torture but above them all the notion of heroism, which taken that manages to deal with all the challenges previously enlisted stands out more than anything we can call heroic nowadays. Mel Gibson’s first and best to date movie perfectly represents his directional style-truthful, heavy, almost unbearable to witness, but with all the gore, all the horrors on the screen with even more potent strength are portrayed the positive emotions like courage, love, dedication-or reality in its two poles at their most powerful-to such extend that they cause internal pain. William Wallace is a usual child that works at a farm and the first time he decides to follow his father on one of his adventures he stumbles upon a barn filled with hanged noblemen-the only men capable of standing against Edward Longshanks the ruthless King of England.

      The boy watches as


      his father dies slain by English and many years after returns to his home to find peace. After the woman he loved is killed, he begins a battle which turns him into Scotland’s most legendary freedom fighter.

      Mel Gibson develops and puts out on the screen an immensely effective character-a person who as a boy learns that the people he loves die with a frightening ease, who from a small age develops in himself the notion of how brutal the world is. Before the first quarter of the film is gone, Wallace loses all the people he loves.

      From there on, his spiritual potential explodes and reigns vigorously inspiringly until the final shot of the film with his sword, victoriously piercing the free land of his country. He opposes his so-called countrymen nobles fascinatingly.

      It is not necessary to give a man power to prove what he has within himself. William is a commoner who led by his dreadful ...


      • destiny decides that there is only one path of him-to fight, not to avenge, maybe because of guilt, but to honor the memory of those who are lost to him with his actions.

        Wallace believes in good and follows it until the very end, aiming to lead the people around him towards it. His actions are thrive one after the other-his words contain ever-lasting truths that stir the heart of the viewers with their power and honesty, his speech on Sterling makes the audience want to charge along against the numerous English.

        We witness beauty and horrors intertwined in Braveheart. What makes the film so emotionally profound is the huge distance between the most beautiful and the most dreadful we see.

        The Middle Ages were exactly this-a time of great passion, tender gorgeousness-when it comes down to the people themselves, and an age of unimagined terrors, when the sword and the blood take their usual predominant place in their

        lives. The visual horrors that hit the bodies of the soldiers are only the background.

        The actual, priceless worth of Braveheart is the qualities it preaches: bravery and the will to do what is right, virtues that Gibson tries to nail into the hearts of those watching with the emotionally devastating scenes-whether it is William’s father’s death, the betrayal of Bruce, the torture scene. What Mel Gibson wants is to land a blow strong enough so that the audience can learn from his film.

        He doesn’t uses complex stylistic directional elements which critics have to decipher-he uses simple visual and spiritual beauty and harshness and nobleness of action-directional tools that make an impression upon the viewer much more strongly than for instance carefully constructed cinematography and an indicative lighting. If Gibson wants to show you something he makes sure he does it.

        In the end, this is all that matters.

        10/10 for this powerful historical epic




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 112051574420431/k2311a052/5.2.12
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