The Last Samurai film  » Movies  »
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  • The film’s finest is without doubt the direction and the tears, provoked by the film’s most potent moments, supported by the complete devotion of the acting cast, led by Tom Cruise and Ken Watanabe, spectacularly adorned by some of Hans Zimmer’s finest compositions to date, the grand cinematography encapsulating emotion at the humane, simple moments, incorporating scale at the breath-taking battle scenes, and capturing magnificence at every glimpse of Japan’s magical nature

    • by Svetozar
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      “Nations like men sometimes have their own destiny”. Each tradition owns a unique beauty and in Edward Zwick’s best epic film the main emotional strings sing under the aerie tranquility of the spirit of Japan.

      Nathan Algren (Tom Cruise) is hired to take out the forces of the rebelling samurai Katsumoto who is one of the few aiming to preserve the old, innate traditions of the country in a time when the modern world is establishing its conventions.

      Algren is captured and led to the village of Katsumoto where he experiences a remarkable change of hearts, of state of mind, receiving for first time in


      his life something worth living, fighting and dying for.

      Nathan is a warrior with a good heart, yet heavily traumatized of his wrongdoings on the battlefields, which naturally results in his desire to find some sort of purpose in the nightmare of his story.

      The samurai give him exactly what he looks for-honor, dignity and most of all fire, a will to life, reasons not to be a shame of who he is, because in the world of the samurai there is no place for shame, only strength.

      Edward Zwick’s main goal in any film is emotion; this is the objective of ...


      • every scene in the film-an emotion, build up on the beautiful landscapes and cinematography, supported by the heart-felt story, the graciously designed spellbinding scenes, the most beautiful of which are cleverly linked with the most precious virtues in the character of the samurai.

        As any beautiful war epic, this is a dark film lit up by the goodness, the love, and the heart-winning good nature of its main characters.

        The film’s finest is without doubt the direction and the tears, provoked by the film’s most potent moments, supported by the complete devotion of the acting cast, led by Tom Cruise and Ken Watanabe, spectacularly adorned

        by some of Hans Zimmer’s finest compositions to date, the grand cinematography encapsulating emotion at the humane, simple moments, incorporating scale at the breath-taking battle scenes, and capturing magnificence at every glimpse of Japan’s magical nature.

        Losses occur, lives end, the destiny of Katsumoto and the face of his Japan, of the true Japan may suffer defeat, but their story ends in peace, in clarity with who they are, while Nathan has yet to live, finally at the end of the road of the true warrior, a warrior who found peace after all the suffering.

        10/10 for the film’s emotional levels at the least.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 112051574410431/k2311a052/5.2.12
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