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  • Maximus Decimus Meridius (Russell Crowe) is the best general of Rome, Emperor Marcus Aurelius’ chosen one to inherit his throne
  • What makes this film truly great is not the stunning visuals, neither the breath-taking duels, nor the amazing score of Hans Zimmer, or the acting, the mesmerizingly written story or direction

    • by Svetozar
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      The historical epic genre has been lost for the world of cinema ever since Ben Hur and its 11 Academy Awards until Mel Gibson’s Braveheart. What Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe did in the end of the second millennium led to 12 Academy Award nominations, too many of which were unfairly not won and ten years of epic films all of them not as good as Gladiator but aiming to reach the glory of the classic Roman epic.

      Maximus Decimus Meridius (Russell Crowe) is the best general of Rome, Emperor Marcus Aurelius’ chosen one to inherit his throne.

      The ruler’s son Commodus kills Maximus’ family, the Emperor, but fails to kill the general, who finds himself taken a slave and thrown on the gladiator arenas.

      Maximus decides to fight his way to the Coliseum where to


      deliver his vengeance and fulfill the dying wish of his master for a better future of the Empire.

      Maximus is a virtuously perfect person, a man of impeccable spiritual qualities but in the same a time an absolute savage beast on the battlefield.

      He struggles to be pious, modest and quiet in the face of his enemies, friends and masters even when he is mouthing words of hatred, he is a cinematic character whose every action wins volumes of respect from the viewer as easily as he conquers his foes.

      His one true wish is of home, away from the battlefields that brought him so much glory, away from the throne of the Empire which is rightfully and whole-heartedly offered to him-a character which wins the heart of the audience within the very first minutes of ...


      • screen time, enriched by one of the best performances of Russell Crowe in his carreer.

        Ridley Scott mixes the hero’s internal and external world, with the glorious scales, traditions and all inspiring details of the Roman Empire shining on the background: on the inside, Maximus dreams of his home-every scene linked with it is poetic, beautiful and majestic, from the outside Maximus is a hero of an Empire, greater than the Emperor itself and the moments of that formidable greatness fill to maddening levels the audience with a triumphant unprecedented in any other film feeling-out on the war-zone where Maximus is making his army and the 50 000 Colleseum crowd roar his name.

        Apart from the Oscar winning performance of Crowe every other in the film is polished almost as equally good-Joaquin Phoenix’s

        depiction of the Emperor, Connie Nielsen’s portrayal of his sister, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed and all the rest of the supporting cast stand stable on their place.

        What makes this film truly great is not the stunning visuals, neither the breath-taking duels, nor the amazing score of Hans Zimmer, or the acting, the mesmerizingly written story or direction.

        This is a beautiful darkness drowned production in which a great man’s life is befallen by a tragedy but who knows the clear truth.

        Before getting back home, before reuniting with his family and finds peace a man must leave the world as a good man, not so much in the face of the others, not to prove something to those watching, but to live as best as possible, to complete his steel soldier’s duty of fighting for good.

        10/10 without doubt.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 112051574400431/k2311a052/5.2.12
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