Mr. Clean Magic Eraser Original Cleaning Pads
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  • When I think of dirt I think of pathogens, not just removing superficial grime, so cleaning is as much about disinfecting as keeping things spotless
  • I was horrified by the stains lined under the toilet seat, disappointed that the former product’s no-scrub formula – the type that you leave for a few minutes – wasn’t working
  • The magic eraser snuffs out stains after light scrubbing, much better than a hard-bristled brush, but I know this chore is not for everybody as it’s very yucky
  • I recommend you get your hands dirty with nothing but the magic eraser


    • by jhunie

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      I count on chemical cleaners to scrub out dirt. When I think of dirt I think of pathogens, not just removing superficial grime, so cleaning is as much about disinfecting as keeping things spotless. But dealing with stains is a matter not entirely solved by chemical cleaners, for which – if only scrubbing isn’t such a chore – I refuse to get my hands dirty. In addition, I’m ignorant about other non-chemical grease cutters. I found a box of Mr. Clean’s magic eraser in the kitchen cabinet where mom kept an arsenal of household cleaning products. Any product that prides itself as a ‘magic eraser’ is given to skepticism; I wonder what makes a block of squishy foam a glorified ‘cleaning pad’ when it looks like a regular sponge. I decide that if it really works, it may be worth getting my hands dirty after all.

      I conclude that cleaning pads are different from regular sponge, as demonstrated by the magic eraser. For one, it’s a superb stain-remover. There’s something in the sponge that mechanically


      scrubs the dirt off. That said, cleaning with a pad isn’t exactly free from the labor of scrubbing itself, but at least every swipe seems to do much and, hence, is effort not wasted. It gets rid of scuff marks too. Number one on my list of items to clean is the back of the airconditioner, which accumulates a lot of dust and construction debris since a new house has been built next to mine. I immerse the magic cleaner in water, wring out and wipe the surface. The A/C is restored back to its white color after months of getting covered in dirt and dusts of cement. It would’ve been a botched job that took a longer time had I not used the magic eraser. The surface is coated so, considering the precautions on the packaging, I gently rub the sponge, and this works fine without scraping or scratching anything.

      My favorite surface to clean with the magic eraser is hard plastic. Soap scum, stains and – the worst – moulds tend to be ...


      • permanently adherent on plastics. A part of the shower door has been discolored with assorted stains. The door is made of hard plastic, like that of monoblock chairs, and astonishingly the magic eraser rubs out filthy stains on plastic quite well. I use it for cleaning plastic drawers, kitchen equipments and, though it takes a bit of work, erasing crayon doodles scrawled on the pale blue walls by my errant nephew and niece.

        There are indelible stains under the toilet bowl seat, rust-colored, which are mineral deposits that tap water perennially brings. I’ve kept an assortment of bleaching solutions, one is a purported toilet cleaner that reigned over the bathroom as the household’s product of choice for weeks, but which the magic eraser has proven mediocre. I was horrified by the stains lined under the toilet seat, disappointed that the former product’s no-scrub formula – the type that you leave for a few minutes – wasn’t working. The toilet looks spotless white at a normal vantage so long as you don’t peer underneath. The magic eraser

        snuffs out stains after light scrubbing, much better than a hard-bristled brush, but I know this chore is not for everybody as it’s very yucky. Just be sure to disinfect the area first before removing stains. It also removes the scum adhering at the bottom of the bathtub.

        The cleaning pad, composed of melamine foam, seems durable enough to withstand heavy scrubbing, either on smooth or coarse surfaces. It is less tiring to use compared to ineffectual methods of scrubbing that, in domestic parlance, is akin to elbow grease. The sponge will tear and deflate and turn flimsy after heavy use. The instruction says to wet it first, but the water appears to merely pass through it, rather than get absorbed, and it doesn’t expand much. I’ve deployed one sponge in the sink which I use to clean the area, and the funny thing is people usually mistake it for a…err…dishwashing sponge. I would buy it myself (price starts at 3 to 8 dollars, I think). I recommend you get your hands dirty with nothing but the magic eraser.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in April, 2012. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 5330041574110130/k2311a0430/4.30.12
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