Milani Paint Eyeshadow Palette
3.5
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  • Without getting too artsy fartsy in my interpretation, I believe most of the shades are sorbet pastels
  • You can definitely make subtle gradations of colors in this palette
  • And apart from using primer, you need not compromise the shades too much to avoid the dreaded costume-party look
  • I recommend it for the 8 dollar price, and simply for the novelty of the colors


    • by jhunie

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      The way I see it, there are 2 kinds of eyeshadows. Category A refers to flattering eyeshadows that we use routinely to look our best, sometimes out of necessity. There’s also category B which is purely for recreation…just like the Milani Paint eyeshadow palette.

      Perhaps inspired from an artist’s literal palette, the Milani Paint eyeshadows suggest the same set of rainbow hues found as permanent fixtures in a standard watercolor palette. While analyzing swatches on the back of my hand, I identified, in an abstract sense, the key hues present in Renoir’s paintings – naturally since the shades were basic and complementary. I’m so used to blending complex eyeshadow shades that the Milani palette almost, well, made me think of little girls’ toy makeup. Without getting too artsy fartsy in my interpretation, I believe most of the shades are sorbet pastels. The colors, if not an exact representation, are within the spectrum of colors seen in a rainbow. These are very soft shades, and the red seems more pinkish to me.

      The light


      sorbet shades don’t show up nicely on my dark eye lids. The purple looks especially ‘morbid’ without eyeshadow primer. The opacity of these eyeshadows, or seemingly the lack thereof, just can’t pass as neon shades. I used to really like the old MAC neons, in individual cookie-sized palettes, which I applied quick and dirty, no primers needed. That, for me, is what retro neon shades are about. In other words, neons are solid colors with great pay-off. You need a very pigmented eye primer to give the colors in the Milani Paint palette more contrast and saturation, but only for those of us with darker eye lids. Back to my contention, these are probably pastels – not neons. So manage your expectations. On the bright side, what looks like an ostentatious combination of bright colors is actually quite wearable. You can definitely make subtle gradations of colors in this palette. And apart from using primer, you need not compromise the shades too much to avoid the dreaded ...

      • costume-party look. By incorporating 2 or 3 of the shades, and adding in a metallic eyeshadow of a relative color at the outer corners, I come up with a rich-hued eye makeup, no in-your-face retro drama involved.

        Even though I have better reasons not to use yellow for my eye makeup (it’s quite cartoonish, and I’ve got no guts to be a John Galliano muse) and certainly not pink, both shades become vibrant upon a brightening base or primer. All eyeshadows in the palette have the flattest and mattest finish, no less. the eyeshadows are somewhat dry and are bound by a powdery formula. Some shades are a bit smoother than others, while other shades are chalky. Speaking of chalk, I resent the texture of the white base, because it really goes on like chalk, and it’s difficult to blend evenly. So I use a bone shade from another palette of mine.

        I have worn the eyeshadows only once for a relatively short period of time, so I can’t comment much about how long

        they last. Worn with primer, they’re sure to last anyway. In that instance, the colors I used remained crease-free. Using the right size of brush, I was able to individually apply the colors without messing the others. A stiff brush may be suitable to apply the powders in as little fallout as possible. I leave the rest to a good shader brush to hone, blend and build the colors. Unlike the Loreal HIP eyeshadows, where you only get 2 shades, the Milani palette gives you 7 matte colors. The shadows are presented as though splashed in a single dish, like blotches of paint. In my mind the packaging is too surreal a palette to resemble a cosmetic product, but it’s effective. I recommend it for the 8 dollar price, and simply for the novelty of the colors. If you already own a complete coastal scents palette, this may strike you as a dupe to some of the shades.

        But for the adventurous, the Milani Paint palette is worth chasing rainbows.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3120121553140531/k2311a1220/12.20.11
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