Gooseberry Patch: Christmas All Through the House  » Books  »
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  • As I looked through this book, I found many of the items sort of attractive, and I had to force myself to remember
  • I like to knit and crochet, but I don't like sewing the things together when I'm done
  • The results were interesting, but more on that later
  • I think that this book would work better as a kind of inspirational source than for its step-by-step instructions

    • by Renaissance Woman
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      All in all, Gooseberry Patch: Christmas All Through the House is an attractive and inspiring book of Christmas projects. It’s a hefty paperback, at about 500 pages in an 8-1/2 by 11 inch format. I’d say about half of the projects have pictures furnished — full color ones of good quality. About half of the items are recipes, and really, that’s what Gooseberry Patch is best at.

      As I looked through this book, I found many of the items sort of attractive, and I had to force myself to remember: a.) I don’t really like to touch felt. b.) I like to knit and crochet, but I don’t like sewing the things together when I’m done. c.) I’m not about to try out many new recipes during the rush


      of the holiday season. Taking those factors into account, there’s not really much here that I’m interested in. I made an experiment of looking through the book and picking out the one item I would most like to make, and the one item I would most like someone to make for me. The results were interesting, but more on that later.

      The book retails for $24.95 US. At least that’s what’s printed on it. I’m reading a library copy, so I don’t have any idea what it really sells for.

      One thing I really did appreciate was that *all* of the items in the book were not red and green. Sometimes this type of book tends to that type of color scheme and induces a kind of Christmas-overload in me.


      • It also has a table of contents *and* a categorized index, which seems like a useful and practical idea.

        I think that this book would work better as a kind of inspirational source than for its step-by-step instructions. For example, there are many food gifts in the book. You might want to use your own recipes (I think nearly everybody has some) and look at the book for ideas about how to package them attractively as gifts. It would also be a good gift for a beginning crafter who wants to try out a lot of different techniques. (The appendix has simple instructions for beginning crocheting, knitting, embroider, and the like.)

        The item I would most like to make, I think, was a set of Christmas stockings made in

        soft fleece and chenille fabrics in soothing blue and white tones. The pictures in this book are just excellent — I could imagine the feel of the fabric. They’re decorated with buttons, rickrack, and other trim (including felt, but I could undoubtedly find something else.) The item I would most like to receive, I think, was a “reader’s scarf.” It’s actually more of a shawl, made of a generous amount of fleece, with a pocket and trim in a print fabric. The pocket is big enough to hold a paperback. (Maybe another pocket for reading glasses would be good, too?)

        Still, I’m not really enthused about either of those two projects, and for my money they were the best in the book. Good thing I got this book from the library, I guess.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 179121549410331/k2311a129/12.9.11
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