Crabtree & Evelyn Rosewater Hand Therapy  » Cosmetics  »
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  • For those with clammy hands, I think the texture of this hand cream is okay
  • Typical hand creams are generally inferior at moisturizing dry hands, I know, since most do no more than the average lotion
  • But in many instances, well-moisturized hands can be a disadvantage
  • I have underrated its hydrating powers, but I believe it gets better every day that I feed my hands of this cream
  • To give the product its due, I recommend the rose water hand therapy for hydrating dry hands, and a very expensive one at that (individually retails at 13 dollars)


    • by jhunie

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      I obsess about hygiene incessantly. I’m proud to say that I wash my hands all the time. Good. I’m embarrassed to say, though, that I’m lazy at moisturizing my hands. Very bad. This introduction obviously leads me to hand creams, in particular the Crabtree & Evelyn rosewater hand therapy.

      Today, I might as well be proud that I’m diligent at tirelessly pouring some of the rosewater hand therapy cream on my hands. It feels divine. It smells good. And my hands look fabulous. I felt the hand cream was not adequately hydrating at first. It took some time for my dry hands to hold in that moisture. For those with clammy hands, I think the texture of this hand cream is okay.


      My hands never get sweaty.

      The whipped consistency of this hand cream is right up my alley. Just because it’s rosewater, the liquid byproduct of distilling rose petals, doesn’t mean the hand cream should be watery. The cream is thicker than lotion but spreads thinly on skin. It is lightweight enough, without suffocating my hands like a glove. Typical hand creams are generally inferior at moisturizing dry hands, I know, since most do no more than the average lotion. A lotion consistency for a hand cream is really akin to putting body lotion on hands, which shouldn’t be, when my fatigued hands have special moisturizing needs beyond any part of the body. If only l could do things hands-free, and treat my hands like royalty without having to lift a finger, I could really slather this all the time. But in many instances, well-moisturized hands can be a disadvantage: I refrain to touch objects with my hands after moisturizing. The hand therapy cream sinks in fast, but it hasn’t changed my manners, still. I save it for last. When I’m done with makeup, my hair, and all things requiring manual work, that’s the right time to put some hand cream on before hitting the door.

      The rosewater hand cream, though I abstain from touching a lot, makes me want to touch my own hands, rather, and feel that silky, soft touch. My palms, exposed to harsh detergents and a regular at the dishwasher, are softer. I have underrated its hydrating powers, but I believe it gets ...


      • Crabtree & Evelyn Rosewater Hand Therapy
      better every day that I feed my hands of this cream. I even failed to notice hangnails because my hands and cuticles feel deceptively smooth (or there probably weren’t till I last checked). My hands used to be so dry, that rubbing my palms against each other would produce a squeak.

      Aside from the sensations I already mentioned – e.g. feeling, touching – it’s also about smelling the rosewater fragrance. It’s impossible to ignore the smell of roses. C&E’s rosewater oozes of powdery roses, and something vaguely woodsy with a lot of musk. For a hand cream, I say the fragrance notes here are pretty transparent, cultivated (although I note that C&E’s overuse of musk in their frags are just as formulaic as, say, bath and body works, and

      yet the difference in price is enormous!) – it’s a scented hand cream, in essence. The scent-throw overlaps with my perfume, but it goes away eventually. The hand therapy cream comes in a tube that seems to be made of tin. Such material gets squished and wrinkled so soon, that I worry about stuffing it inside my purse. Not very travel-friendly. I look up to C&E as an arbiter of taste in the fragrance industry, but to put such a good product in a toothpaste tube is just not cool. To give the product its due, I recommend the rose water hand therapy for hydrating dry hands, and a very expensive one at that (individually retails at 13 dollars). It’s like wearing a garland of roses tied on your wrist.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3124101540710131/k2311a1024/10.24.11
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