Studio Basics Dual Tip Paddle and Point Cosmetic Applicator
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  • I love the readiness of having two different applicators in one cotton bud
  • It’s possible I doused the q-tip too much, but I would recommend brushes, alternatively, for better results
  • I know it’s frustrating to scrawl a thin line without the applicator gushing out too much ink
  • I found it easy to use this cotton applicator, since it partially absorbs the ink while giving a controlled amount
  • I like to use it for removing tight-lined eyeliner on the waterline


    • by jhunie

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      Q-tip is, arguably, the secret to achieving near-perfect makeup. It’s the unsung tool that every makeup buff uses. Apart from the generic use of cleaning one’s ears, I turn to the Studio Basics dual tip paddle/point applicator, a special q-tip made for applying cosmetics.

      The Studio Basics dual tip applicator is the q-tip for makeup lovers. There are corners the ordinary cotton swab is too blunt for use where the paddle and point becomes my applicator of choice. These q-tips are soft and not fuzzy. Even after frequent rubbing, the q-tip is resilient retaining its shape (except when wet). Each applicator has dual tips shaped for specific purposes. At one end is a paddle tip, flat and pod-shaped, and a pointy tip on the opposite end. I love the readiness of having two different applicators in one cotton bud. It’s very easy to switch between one tip to the other. Multipurpose and disposable, it’s highly hygienic too.

      Just so you know, this one is not the “unsinkable paddle.” I sometimes use wet


      q-tips to saturate eyeshadow, amplifying its pigmentation. The paddle tip, just like rounded cotton swabs, is very absorbent – but turns soggy. It retains much of the water, until, after rubbing it several times, the tip becomes too squishy for application. And so the paddle sinks in water, figuratively. It’s possible I doused the q-tip too much, but I would recommend brushes, alternatively, for better results. The paddle tip cleans up bits of brow powder and eyeshadow fall outs, and no, put that scotch tape away (used to be the way to do it). The flat paddle performs like any regular sponge applicator in smudging eyeshadow. I keep so many eye palettes, and most of the sponge applicators in them I’ve lost. The paddle tip serves me well as a replacement.

      The point tip is a goof-buster. It’s super useful for undoing small flaws because of its fine point, as pointed as the nib of a pen. As perfecting touch to manicure, the point tip is excellent at removing stray bits of ...


      • nail polish around or outside the cuticles. I dip it in nail polish remover and scrape off the nail polish that went beyond the edges of the cuticles, defining the shape of my nails. I’m a stickler for clump-free mascara. If not, clumps would wreak havoc when the flakes fall out. The pointed applicator separates clumped lashes and blots the clumps at the same time. It’s alright at cleaning lipstick smears. If you happen to have liquid eyeliner with a watery consistency, the pointed end works better than the eyeliner’s applicator. I know it’s frustrating to scrawl a thin line without the applicator gushing out too much ink. I found it easy to use this cotton applicator, since it partially absorbs the ink while giving a controlled amount. Use it like a quill to make the thinnest line.

        Both ends, or the q-tip as a whole, have possible uses for hygiene and skincare as well. I’m prone to eye infection, especially around the lash line. You might think the pointed tip

        looks lethal for the eyes, but it’s actually better and more precise in removing eyeliner over and under the lash line compared to rounded q-tips. I like to use it for removing tight-lined eyeliner on the waterline. It doesn’t poke the eyes as long as you sweep the applicator pointing at your tear duct or in its side. The bigger, bulbous shape of round q-tips tends to poke my eyes. I use both applicators to apply zit cream or targeted spot treatments. The paddle works in spreading the cream while the sharper applicator cleans the excess, as I don’t like it to spread to unaffected skin. I’m a little mystified by the square marking on the paddle tip. It is my guess that the paddle applicators are initially manufactured as round cotton buds, but pressed flat by a square device, ending in a dimple/depression at the center. These q-tips are so hoard-worthy at the price of 1.99 dollars. Alongside brushes, I recommend adding the Studio Basics dual tip applicator to your set of makeup tools.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3114101538520131/k2311a1014/10.14.11
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