Samsung Countertop Microwave Oven (MW73B)
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  • Thawing may be unnecessary for smaller portions of food as the defrost setting in the microwave can actually cook it, based on my experience, like in the case of hams and bacons
  • While poring through the manual, I learned a juicy tip about multistage cooking
  • Cooking bacon, for example, needs only 2 stages to cook, from defrost to finished, and I like it this way because the bacon sheds most of its fatty content
  • A sensor would have been ideal so the microwave can have a temperature-controlling mechanism to avoid overcooked food
  • If your kitchen is already well-equipped with a range or professional oven, I’d recommend choosing a basic countertop microwave like this and save your money from paying extra unneeded features


    • by jhunie

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      If I have my go-to cookbook for whipping up quick meals, I also have a go-to appliance in the kitchen. I’m talking about my Samsung countertop microwave oven. It started with the need to quickly heat/reheat the food in the house. I wound up eating microwavables, but I discovered this microwave can do so much more than just preparing my morning coffee.

      As long as you know your way around microwave-cooking, this Samsung countertop microwave beats cooking time at best. Rather than using gas, it is a handy help in the kitchen when you’re pressed for time. I’m surprised that microwavable foods have expanded to other healthy options like salads and vegetables. Most of these microwavable meals take only 5 minutes to cook. I’ve also found a versatile microwave-safe pot that allows me to cook stews and viands with rice. It works fantastically with this microwave! I still am a midnight binger, and occasionally I pop a cup of ramen noodles to prepare a quick snack. However it does require some tinkering. I still get confused between the microwave button and the start button, often mixing up their functions.


      You really have to learn how to operate this thing, because it comes without the given cooking presets in other models (i.e. it wouldn’t know if it’s cooking popcorn or not). Alternatively, it provides only 3 cooking settings: ready meals, frozen ready meals, and drinks. Despite the low wattage (highest at 800), I’ve browned chicken in it once. And it was cooked sumptuously, indicating that the microwave had even heat distribution, although it was my sauce that didn’t taste so great.

      Need to thaw food? Then microwave it. According to me, microwave is the fastest way to defrost frozen food, referring specifically to large, chunky meats that often take forever to thaw. You should keep your eyes peeled at the meat before it turns from frozen to dehydrated. Once the meat has lost a lot of its moisture, then its nutritional contents depreciate. Thawing may be unnecessary for smaller portions of food as the defrost setting in the microwave can actually cook it, based on my experience, like in the case of hams and bacons. Along the process this might require you to break up the meat or turn it ...


      • the other side, as with chicken breasts, cued by the sound of a beep. It gets to a cumbersome point, particularly for defrosting/reheating multiple quantities of foods or drinks, when you have to approximate their weights, in addition to setting up the time. The defrost presets ease that a bit, though the range of food is scanty, which include fruits, bread, poultry, and meat (no vegetables?).

        While poring through the manual, I learned a juicy tip about multistage cooking. I’m very close to perfecting, what I’d call, the art of microwave-cooking in a pinch. Multistage cooking in the basic sense is heating food automatically and progressively – from defrosting to a ready, fully cooked meal. You can set it up to 3 stages, in different heat levels. Cooking bacon, for example, needs only 2 stages to cook, from defrost to finished, and I like it this way because the bacon sheds most of its fatty content. For bigger meals, it can’t go without some trial and error, since progressive heating tends to cook the food in advance, earlier than expected; thus food could get overcooked in the end.

        I have scanned the manual twice,

        and it seems that this microwave lacks a sensor feature. A sensor would have been ideal so the microwave can have a temperature-controlling mechanism to avoid overcooked food. I feel slightly cheated. To ensure longevity of this appliance, its best to clean the vents and interior. I’m happy that this countertop microwave demands little effort to clean, as it has no charcoal filters or other replaceable parts. Without that, however, the microwave can start to smell weird (avoid broiling fish if possible). I let the door open for several minutes to aerate the interior of the microwave. Deodorizing the space inside the microwave is possible thru boiling a cup of lemon juice diluted in water, should you wish to kill the odors. The corners of its interiors are rounded; the microwave virtually has no crevices inside on which residue and dirt can accumulate. Reasonably priced, it retails at 130 dollars. If your kitchen is already well-equipped with a range or professional oven, I’d recommend choosing a basic countertop microwave like this and save your money from paying extra unneeded features. The most fundamental thing you need to know: this thing can cook.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 536091528680330/k2311a096/9.6.11
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