Victor & Rolf Flowerbomb Rollerball Perfume  » Perfume  »
4.0
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  • In past tense, Flowerbomb was one of the interesting floral perfumes I tried
  • I like that Flowerbomb has a certain eccentricity that’s never outrageous
  • Of the two, I love and hate the other, respectively


    • by jhunie

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      I emptied my rollerball perfume of Flowerbomb by Victor & Rolf many months back. But Flowerbomb is never a passing scent you’ll forget, even after a long time. It was a silly thought that a bomb existed in that small rollerball. True. Up to this day, the persistence of the scent to remain in my purse continues to haunt me and thus the reason why my purse smells of patchouli. Now the patchouli has transmuted to the smell of cigars. I may be starting off this review with a wry tone, although traces of the perfume today barely, if not at all, capture the scent. In past tense, Flowerbomb was one of the interesting floral perfumes I tried. Oriental florals make my head whirl and are typically too strong for me. Flowerbomb fits in that class but it explodes with a lot of attitude and allure without making me dizzy.

      Yes, a bomb lives in that


      rollerball. But this fragrance is not a bouquet of flowers. Ironically I get the floral notes as an afterthought to the fragrance overall. Instead, the bomb blows loads of sweet confections and patchouli that they shove the florals aside. Think: candies, caramel, vanilla, liquorice, etc. You can call it sugar-bomb if you’d like. The rollerball was more concentrated than I hoped. It’s a strong, sweet scent that could strike a nerve for some who have distaste for sugary smells, like me. Flowerbomb is a split between a classy cocktail perfume and a drab, guileless scent of a young girl. It is sweet and fresh, too, because of the bright bergamot. Flowerbomb somewhat addresses the generation gap between the young and old, but sophisticated. Young and old alike can wear this perfume. I like that Flowerbomb has a certain eccentricity that’s never outrageous.

      Perfumes out of rollerballs may smell flat than their spray counterparts.


      • I observe that scents from rollerballs don’t diffuse as much as when sprayed. It’s like the top notes never reach their full potential. And the different notes are compacted to a rather isolated fragrance on the skin, which gives me a hard time to identify them individually. For Flowerbomb, the musky patchouli base smells evident right out of the rollerball. The perfume is a sweet bomb, but it’s patchouli that stays from beginning to end. Well, when I have it on, my skin doesn’t seem to come to an end from smelling like patchouli (analogous to my purse many months later). Despite that, Flowerbomb is anything but a scrubber patchouli fragrance. Patchouli here smells milder, not the dark and dirty aroma in vintage perfumes (e.g. YSL Kouros).

        Flowerbomb doesn’t have the off-kilter provocation, which strikes me more like inelegant sweetness, of Angel by Thierry Mugler. I’ll choose Flowerbomb over the former anytime. A friend once

        commented that it smelled comparable to Angel. Correct. Flowerbomb has a similar sweet and oriental composition. Angel is one big gourmand perfume that smells of baked goodies and…gasoline. I would rather be anosmic than smell that scent. Flowerbomb, from the name itself, may sound more intimidating next to Angel. However, Flowerbomb has a tamed sweetness compared to the grotesque scent of Angel. Of the two, I love and hate the other, respectively.

        If the perfume can cling inside the lining of my purse after such a long time, it already denotes that the perfume lasts for hours on skin as well, which is remarkable for a rollerball. Naturally, a rollerball cannot match the scent throw of a spray bottle. Flowerbomb is pricy (cheapest runs at 30 dollars while the full size bottle costs 100!). It’s worth buying a decant, in case you’re not planning of cultivating a fat juice of sweet patchouli and get broke.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 5629081525951031/k2311a0829/8.29.11
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