Samsung Corby 2 GT-S3850  » Phones  »
4.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • Samsung, I think, has branched out to budget phones more than any of its competitors
  • Seeing that some of the widgets are also incorporated in the menu, I thought they were redundant
  • I believe its predecessor, the first corby, missed this important feature
  • The fast speed of the browser definitely makes up for it (or I’m just lucky to have a good wireless connection
  • If you’re constrained to a tight budget, the corby 2 packs a wallop, and it’s the only touchscreen budget phone I can recommend at 100 dollars


    • by jhunie

      TRUSTWORTHY

      followers:24
      follow
      Samsung has played a key role in the democratization of touchscreen mobile phones. Years ago, most of us probably dreamt of one, but the acquisition of a smartphone at the time was unattainable, unless you’ve got the means to afford an iphone. At present day, that’s no longer the case, and smartphones just got smarter, while prices stretched within our budget’s reach. Samsung, I think, has branched out to budget phones more than any of its competitors. The Samsung Corby 2 counts as one of such budget phones. From my former android, I saw it fit to switch to a corby because I liked its keypad layout (in touchscreen) for texting, as opposed to the full qwerty touch-typing, which I’m no good at all. It may be unreasonable to exchange an android phone for a corby, but I was never an android fan in the first place. The corby is popular among young people for its colorful back plates and affordable price. But in my case, as someone who occasionally shifts between iOS and android, is it a downgrade or not?

      Being a budget phone doesn’t detract from my opinion that the Samsung corby 2 is a


      qualified smartphone. Despite that it’s made to be hip, it turns out to have fewer quirks, and it’s simple enough for basic use. Consider the keypad layout for instance: on the touchscreen, the keys are modeled after the now-extinct alphanumeric arrangement. The keys are roomy in size, and typing is less prone to errors. My texting with two thumbs takes on a slight familiarity. Yet it’s still unable to match the effortless intuitiveness of a tangible keypad. The touch-sensitive screen requires deliberate push to respond. The keys on the right side are a little cramped, and I often accidentally touch the wrong key under backspace. But I got the hang of it. The Samsung interface was also simpler than expected. A homescreen sums up to 5 pages, each page you can stuff with widgets (I guess they’re equivalent to apps). At first I was confused what to make of the widgets and how they differ from the default icons on the menu. Seeing that some of the widgets are also incorporated in the menu, I thought they were redundant. Basically, whatever clutters your homescreen must come from the widgets tab, not ...

      • from the menu. The corby 2 performs the same tasks I do in a smartphone, so it’s not really a downgrade.

        The corby’s processing power can manage graphic-enriched themes and video playback, but there’s a noticeable latency in shifting homescreens and animations. To those who want to snag a phone with a large screen, the corby 2 has adequate screen size at 3.14 inches, for displaying photos and streaming videos via youtube. The display is a bit anemic in pixels, with blocky icons. The phone, in candybar shape, is a handful in size and very light. At 2 megapixels the camera, I assumed, would serve no purpose. I take that back now; it’s actually pretty decent. It loads up faster than my other android phone, and some of my photos actually look flattering (by that I mean my mug shots are worth posting at facebook). The pictures have a soft quality, although lacking sharpness.

        A smartphone can’t be fun without wi-fi. That completes the corby 2 and puts it above other phones within its price range. I believe its predecessor, the first corby, missed this important feature. It comes preloaded with the usual social-networking widgets,

        such as twitter, facebook, youtube, etc. All of which work well. What has been indispensable is the web browser. It’s a shame there’s no multi-touch though. The fast speed of the browser definitely makes up for it (or I’m just lucky to have a good wireless connection?). The email client could be improved (gmail). My next objective will be to browse Samsung apps. From the looks of it, the apps they’ve got are bleak and are developed for executive purposes.

        The corby 2 has a healthy battery life. The phone can extend to 3 days of heavy use (as in endless texting). And it’s needless to bring the charger to work. If you care to splash some personalized themes on your homescreen, the internet supplies a myriad of them. Mine has angry birds on it. The proprietary features unique only to Samsung phones are retained. I especially find the mobile tracker and fake call very useful. If you’re constrained to a tight budget, the corby 2 packs a wallop, and it’s the only touchscreen budget phone I can recommend at 100 dollars. In the realm of smartphones, the Samsung corby 2 fits in.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3716081521871231/k2311a0816/8.16.11
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy