Kerastase Resistance Ciment Thermique Blow-dry lotion
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  • Therefore, to distinguish Ciment Thermique, its emphasis is on strengthening hair to avoid hair-breakage, while Nectar nourishes
  • I do agree that it prevents hair breakage, where styling is involved
  • I think, in hindsight, Nectar Thermique was more conditioning
  • To everyone in the market for a top of the line heat protectant, I recommend Kerastase’s thermiques (both this and Nectar)


    • by jhunie

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      Nectar Thermique was my favorite blow-dry lotion, until I knew of its other sister, the Ciment Thermique. All the same, both products come from Kerastase and, interchangeably, deserve to be my favorite. I parted from Nectar thermique since I ran out. Then it was high time for a different blow-dry lotion (Nectar Thermique eluded me in stores and salons), well not so different in terms of the brand (though I’ve no logical sense how Ciment differs from Nectar, by name, but in formula, it’s explicable). If not for the trivial differences in formula and fragrance, I would have blindly mistaken Ciment Thermique as the former. Therefore, to distinguish Ciment Thermique, its emphasis is on strengthening hair to avoid hair-breakage, while Nectar nourishes. My hair hardly needs undue styling. But blowing a jet of warm air sometimes is the quickest way to beat drying time. And the Ciment Thermique accomplishes that without frying my hair.

      As thermal protectant, the lotion or milk, as it’s called, protects the hair from damage


      and enhances the styling fix of hair dryers. My hair sways with lightness, and the milk gets rid of crisp ends. If possible, I skip heat styling except drying my hair. For that reason, I simply use the milk as a blow-dry lotion. Since it’s heat activated, the Ciment Thermique exhibits best its styling prowess when used together with heat styling applicances. And because it readies hair for further styling, it works above an ordinary detangling product, though it certainly assists in loosening those knots when brushing. The milk feels icky as you work it out on damp hair, but it warms up to a silky texture, helping me to finish blow-drying faster, without tugging.

      In all truth, my hair emerges sleek and practically styled after blow-drying. My rebonded, straight hair can do without a straightening iron. Consequently, even though I can dash out the door immediately, I just want to reach my brush and marvel at the silkiness of my hair (or I simply feel bad about not ...


      • using that giant brush often, when my rebonded hair defeats the purpose of using a brush). To maximize the lustrous shine, I add some drops of argan oil serum to finish it. It’s very easy to brush my hair; brushing buffs the shine.

        The milk has the consistency of watery conditioners, thus less creamy, and dampens hair a little. I apply it like any serum, manually combing through the lengths of my hair. Sometimes I idly blow the dryer in random sections. As my wet hair starts to clump up, I run it through a wide-toothed detangler, so I don’t start out with a nest on my head before blowing it with a dryer. I tend to apply a lavish amount to cover my long hair, particularly the tips, where split ends eat away my hair. The fragrance smells fresh and somewhat fruity.

        In formula, Ciment Thermique is a fortifying leave-in treatment. Prescribed for damaged locks, the product seems to be doing its job, although my hair was far from

        damaged at the outset. On the contrary, my hair-fall woes still bug me every time I brush my hair. Having said that, I reserve doubts about its supposed strengthening claim. I do agree that it prevents hair breakage, where styling is involved. I surmise that hair-fall is just normal for my hair. If I blow-dry my hair in its naked glory, that is, without a thermal protectant, my hair gets dry sooner. In a sense, Ciment Thermique compensates the moisture lost from blow-drying. By retaining moisture, I get fewer frizzes and longer manageability. I think, in hindsight, Nectar Thermique was more conditioning. Yet that makes only a slight difference. Though I have yet to try, and I specified it as a blow-dry lotion, Ciment Thermique, actually, is a thermal protectant for straightening and curling as well. It has a very prohibitive price, however, at 30 dollars. To everyone in the market for a top of the line heat protectant, I recommend Kerastase’s thermiques (both this and Nectar).




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 315081518530531/k2311a085/8.5.11
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