Babylon 5: Season 1, Episode 11: Believers  » TV  »
3.5
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  • Given the issue, it's not all that surprising, though I was surprised De'Lenn didn't stand up for them as her race has a strong spiritual bent as well
  • I think the episode did make an honest attempt to be even handed about the issue, but it's hard to justify a dying child
  • While I thought that having the ship named the Asimov was a nice nod, this didn't really add anything to the episode


    • by David Finniss

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      From the opening shot, you can tell what the plot of this episode is going to center on. A sick, bed ridden boy and two parents wearing what look like ceremonial robes. You don’t even need the episode title to tell you that the boy is going to need a procedure that the parents object to for religious reasons.

      While Dr. Franklin isn’t the most spiritual person out there, he at least has the good sense to try and be diplomatic. He even chides a colleague for attacking the parents’ beliefs. Granted, as the episode progresses, he’s not as accepting, but at least he was trying.

      Franklin is eventually forced to go to Commander Sinclair for authorization to override the parents’, and even the child’s,


      request not to go through with it. He shows himself to be more open minded, but isn’t fond of the idea of letting a kid die.

      The supporting cast basically sits this one out. The parents go to Londo, De’Lenn, and G’kar to ask for them to represent them, but all three decline. Given the issue, it’s not all that surprising, though I was surprised De’Lenn didn’t stand up for them as her race has a strong spiritual bent as well. If anyone was going to be able to plead their case, it seemed like it would be her.

      I think the episode did make an honest attempt to be even handed about the issue, but it’s hard to justify a dying child. Considering ...


      • how the episode wraps up, it becomes even harder to side with the parents.

        There’s a subplot where Ivanova goes on a rescue mission to escort a ship back to the station. While I thought that having the ship named the Asimov was a nice nod, this didn’t really add anything to the episode. We’re given only the barest explanation for it and we’re not told why it’s being attacked or even by who. I think it was added to add some sense of action to the drama heavy story, not to mention fill up some of the run time.

        Credit where credit is due, Ivanova’s rant when Sinclair told her to go get Garibaldi was rather amusing, a bit jarring given her character, but amusing

        none the less.

        I did find it a little hard to believe that they couldn’t find another method of treatment, even with all of the advanced tech at their disposal. Maybe rule of drama applies here, but you’d think that they would have more than two options.

        This episode was OK. It certainly wasn’t the greatest episode. The moral ambiguity made for some good drama, but it wasn’t as compelling as some of the other episodes. Considering it’s just a one and done episode, I suppose it did it’s job, but even taking that into consideration, this is still relatively weak.

        It’s not a bad episode by any stretch, but I would hardly tout it as one of the show’s crowning achievements in terms of writing either.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1017061496980230/k2311a0617/6.17.11
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