LG Frontloading Dryer, DLE2516W
4.5
1 votes
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  • When our old dryer finally required fixing, it was high time to get a new one and give up the exorbitant cost to have our former dryer fixed
  • I heard you can throw thick bed covers and blankets in other high-capacity dryers, and I’d definitely need one
  • I love the ‘Speed-dry’ option, and I could have a dress ready after 25 minutes of drying time
  • By default, I found the ‘Normal’ level was usually adequate enough
  • I highly recommend this dryer for the price (600 dollars)


    • by jhunie

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      When our old dryer finally required fixing, it was high time to get a new one and give up the exorbitant cost to have our former dryer fixed. That dryer came together with a matching washer upon purchase. This time, I deeply considered a standalone dryer, something with more room to accommodate a lot of clothes. I heard you can throw thick bed covers and blankets in other high-capacity dryers, and I’d definitely need one. The reason why my bed, for instance, has been pestered by dust mites – thereby causing skin allergies - is that I’m not diligent at regularly washing covers. I really complained at the prices of most dryers nowadays, but putting my money on an LG front-loader was a great investment I never regretted to this day.

      I am a neat-freak and want to keep my towels clean at all times. At the time air-drying was the only mode of drying clothes, it was a pain to dry heavy fabrics. We had a washer with a built-in dryer, but it didn’t have much space for weighty garments. Having this dryer surely put my laundry schedule permanently every week. Now I can wash and dry clothes regularly, and I only have to spare one afternoon to finish everything. If for some reason I fret


      over what to wear and forget to wash something beforehand, I can’t stress how helpful this dryer is in washing my clothes on the run. I love the ‘Speed-dry’ option, and I could have a dress ready after 25 minutes of drying time. I tend to do a different drying cycle for delicate fabrics particularly undergarments (the ‘Delicate’ cycle is spot-on for this). Tossing it along the rest of my regular laundry, in a drying mode that’s not appropriate for such fabrics, over-dries the cottony make of certain types of underwear. Over-drying them damages the fabric, so they tear apart when stretched.

      There are a bunch of controls in this dryer, from adjusting the level of dryness, the temperature, and the length of time; I can let the dryer take charge by opting for sensor dry cycles. The ‘Sensor’ cycles are kind of preset and automatic, whereas ‘Manual’ allows you to choose the settings. I should say most of the controls are purely arbitrary, such as the feature to customize the time – either by lowering or increasing it. By default, I found the ‘Normal’ level was usually adequate enough. I estimate an average load will take a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes. For heavy loads, it usually lasts close to an hour. It’s important to ...


      • group the clothes according to types of fabrics, so they’re evenly dried and avoid damaging those that were accidentally tossed to a higher temperature. A LED display was a nice touch compared to the thermostat dial we used to have.

        The drying duration becomes somewhat erratic when the moisture sensor is used. It gets done faster than the time I anticipate it to finish. The minor drawback in employing the dryer’s moisture sensor is that at times some of the clothes are still damp at the end of a drying cycle. That slight moisture left in clothes primes them up for pressing. And it’s true. It’s really easier to smooth out the wrinkles while fabrics retain a bit of moisture, but that doesn’t hold true for all types of garments. Some synthetics are typically resistant to wrinkles and don’t require ironing, so it sucks sometimes that the clothes are not utterly dry yet. However, roughly 60 percent of the time, I don’t feel it’s necessary to iron most of the finished clothes, because the dryer does a fine job of removing the wrinkles. In that sense, it cuts the time I allot for pressing them or it’s simply not needed. If less time is spent on ironing, then that adds up to saving energy costs

        /> too. In the likely event that some clothes end up damp (or that they’re quite moist to be wearable), clothes that are exempt for ironing must be done again for another round of drying. But I make sure not to over-dry them. I strive to really dry the clothes, because I absolutely detest how some detergents smell musty on moist fabrics. You should keep that in mind.

        I appreciate very much that the interior has light inside. It’s very quiet too. The lint filter is a bit tricky to clean though. Recently I used the rack that came with the package for drying my nephew and niece’s sneakers, and they came out clean and free of odors. The dryer includes very specific instructions for installation as well as setting up the appliance to its power source if you’ll be using electricity. Hiring the services of others or a skilled technician might be necessary. It’s not operable right out of the box and necessitates proper setting up of electrical cables, which is beyond what a regular person can do. I highly recommend this dryer for the price (600 dollars). If a regular thermostat dryer does not provide better customization and you’re finicky about how your clothes are dried, this LG dryer offers that and much more for the fussy user.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 5313061493670830/k2311a0613/6.13.11
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