Cuisinart Electric Skillet CSK-150, 1500 watts
5.0
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  • In the event that I run out of gas, this skillet has been an invaluable backup facility for preparing simple meals, while saving a bit on the cost
  • Of all the cooking pans we owned equipped with nonstick coating, I think I’ve finally harnessed this popular feature of pans at the fullest in the electric skillet
  • I believe it’s very economical, in that the nonstick coating requires little to no oil
  • I very much liked that the skillet preheats the oil, so to avoid it from spitting out or spattering the heated oil like in metal pans, which, in contrary, harshly handles the oil


    • by jhunie

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      My mom once sent me an electric skillet at the time I was living on my own space and was struggling to put up a decent cooking facility. Come cooking time, I was such a lousy cook, and I’d end up wasting a lot of gas. The one thing that saved me from getting starved to death was this Cuisinart electric skillet. Now that I have moved back home, it still beats my kitchen blues.

      In the event that I run out of gas, this skillet has been an invaluable backup facility for preparing simple meals, while saving a bit on the cost. This has provided me my favorite cooking arena for whipping up tasty pancakes in the morning, and mom’s doing something else in the stove at the same time. To get oriented a little on its controls, the unit includes a device called the temperature probe. The temperature probe displays the range of temperatures from warm to 450. The controls are integrated upon its heat-resistant handle, and extend towards the wire and plug. The wire which powers up the skillet is very short, btw.

      Of all the cooking pans we owned equipped with


      nonstick coating, I think I’ve finally harnessed this popular feature of pans at the fullest in the electric skillet. I believe it’s very economical, in that the nonstick coating requires little to no oil. The food glides smoothly across the pan, better than any nonstick pans I’ve used. I very much liked that the skillet preheats the oil, so to avoid it from spitting out or spattering the heated oil like in metal pans, which, in contrary, harshly handles the oil. The bad side to that is it takes a few minutes before you can begin cooking. The dimensions of the skillet, in a rather elongated oval shape, provide more real estate to accommodate small and large sizes of foods. Cooking pancake batter, for one, can go side by side at once and even squeeze another one. Simple griddling, such as frying, is where the skillet does best. It browns fish to perfection. In breaded or coated foods, however, I find sometimes that the heat may not penetrate deeply inside the meat as well as under fire.

      In all fairness, this electric pan yields stable heat similarly to that of a conventional stove.


      • I don’t feel the tension involved in cooking under the fire anymore, and I just cook at a leisurely pace, since the skillet hardly burns the food. The vent, a hole found at one side of the glass cover, seems large enough to regulate the temperature inside the cooking surface. Water condenses upon the glass lid, though, and compromises the clarity of the transparent cover, therefore, making it difficult for me to check (excuse my poor vision) how the food is cooking inside. In time, the glass becomes tantamount to a fogging windshield of a car. Anyway, such a case didn’t come unprecedented, as I had had with cooking in glass-covered casseroles. This case is especially unique to boiling liquids of a greater amount upon the skillet. Although it’s probably counter-intuitive to do so in a frying skillet, the medium height of its base actually allows wet cooking. But don’t expect it to boil the food, especially meat, like that of a pressurized vessel. It takes so much time. As for softening vegetables, the skillet performs sub-par, but workable still.

        More than just a frying pan you can abandon for days

        unclean in a kitchen corner, I fear that letting oil stagnate upon the nonstick surface would affect its efficiency, and I hate the stale smell of it, so I make sure to always clean the skillet post-cooking. In doing so, be careful not to use abrasive sponges when cleaning the nonstick surface. The skillet is immersible in water, but the detachable temperature controls must be removed. It was stated on the manual that the item is also dishwasher safe. I shrugged that bit off, because it’s impractical to shove this skillet inside the dishwasher where it would only occupy too much space, or there’s nary a space at all for such a large appliance. So I make do by washing it manually. It’s not messy, and the skillet’s bottom hardly needs any cleaning as it doesn’t accumulate black residues from exposure to fire. This electric pan has really elevated my dexterity in cooking. I recommend it fully. I suppose buying one would cost you above a hundred dollars. If you wish to cook conveniently while employing resources that’s readily available at all times like electricity, then you might veer towards electric skillets.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 5317051481750231/k2311a0517/5.17.11
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