The Dick Van Dyke Show (TV Show) - The Making of a Councilman (Episode)  » TV  »
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  • I was also really impressed with how spot-on and honest the writers portrayed election campaigns in this episode
  • The episode repeatedly reinforces how people tend to gravitate toward the more personable and charismatic candidate, such as when Rob and his rival are taking questions at a women's organization and Rob is the star because of his interesting career and looks, yet during a press conference, Rob can't answer a single question with the kind of precision and detail that his rival is able to
  • About the only problem I have with the episode The Making of a Councilman is that there's no follow-up episode to the events in this two part story
  • I was surprised how this episode made a reference to Nixon as the series seemed to typically avoid making references to real people or events
  • I also felt the guest star that portrayed Rob's opponent was definitely the right guy for the role as he looked brainy and, when standing next to Rob, didn't look as handsome


    • by CirclingCanvas

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      “The Making of a Councilman” is an episode from “The Dick Van Dyke Show”. It continues and concludes the story started in the previous episode, “I Do Not Choose to Run”. In the previous episode, much of the story focused on Rob’s decision whether or not to run for a vacant chair on the New Rochelle City Council, while in this episode, much of the story focuses on Rob’s campaign and the end result of his run. What I liked most about this episode was how the writers continued to explore a theme started in the previous episode, and that theme was Rob’s self-doubt. I feel that this episode as well as the previous episode were both good “character stories” for Rob because he reacted to the campaign in a very human and in character manner that the audience could relate to. I also believe that the episodes were written in such a way as to invoke an emotional response from the audience so that the audience would root for Rob and want him to win as much as his family and

      friends do, or at least that’s the feeling I get when I watch the episodes. I liked how Rob’s doubt continued to grow as this episode progressed because he felt more and more like his rival was more knowledgeable and thus more deserving to win. It was compelling television to see him struggle over whether or not to stay in the race.

      I was also really impressed with how spot-on and honest the writers portrayed election campaigns in this episode. On one hand, the voters could choose Rob, who’s good-looking and sincere but not very knowledgeable when it comes to how the government operates and the issues and on the other hand, the voters could choose Rob’s opponent, who’s pretty average looking and dull but very knowledgeable on seemingly everything and has detailed objectives and positions. The episode repeatedly reinforces how people tend to gravitate toward the more personable and charismatic candidate, such as when Rob and his rival are taking questions at a women’s organization and Rob is the star because of his interesting career and looks, yet during a press conference,


      • Rob can’t answer a single question with the kind of precision and detail that his rival is able to. The episode makes a very clear and accurate statement about how the most qualified and intelligent candidate doesn’t always win and how superficial voters can sometimes be. One of the funny, reoccurring gags in this episode has Rob often times remarking in disbelief, “I didn’t know that,” both to his wife and his opponent when both bring up things he wasn’t aware of. This is especially funny during the press conference, when Rob practically becomes an admirer of his opponent in front of everyone.

        About the only problem I have with the episode “The Making of a Councilman” is that there’s no follow-up episode to the events in this two part story. The writers crafted an elaborate and special two part story that opens up the possibilities in terms of new stories and comical situations, and yet after this episode, the writers never do anything with Rob’s new status. It kind of renders this and the previous episode meaningless and makes it seem

        like they never happened. That was disappointing. I’m still very glad this episode and the previous one were made though because they’re both quite funny and well-performed. I was surprised how this episode made a reference to Nixon as the series seemed to typically avoid making references to real people or events. Still, the joke was appropriate and comical. I also felt the guest star that portrayed Rob’s opponent was definitely the right guy for the role as he looked brainy and, when standing next to Rob, didn’t look as handsome. Plus, he delivered his lines in an almost monotone sort of way, which further contrasted him with Rob. The writers cram an awful lot into this twenty-five minute episode, and it might seem as if the story was rushed a bit as a result, but overall, the writers give the audience a very good taste of the campaign while still taking the time to delve into Rob’s character and explore his conflicting feelings. A very solid wrap-up to a two part story that really, really needed at least one follow-up episode.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in April, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1025041470720530/k2311a0425/4.25.11
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