Burmese Days by George Orwell  » Books  »
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  • I found the main character, John Flory, to be very well written
  • While the world has changed a lot since this book was written, I think the plight of this character remains something we can relate to
  • Perhaps his descriptions of nature and Burmese society aren't the stuff of greatness, but they don't clog the prose and are interesting to the reader
  • One of the things I've enjoyed the most is the little bits of humour scattered here and there

    • by Eliza26
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      Burmese Days was Orwell’s first novel. Less famous than the writer’s classic dystopias, 1984 and Animal Farm, and somewhat lacking their power and originality, this work is still high quality Orwell.

      The novel deals with British colonialism in Burma in the 1930s. I found the main character, John Flory, to be very well written. He is a thinking man in a world where


      independent opinion is frowned upon. His tragedy is that he can’t stand up for his beliefs. Passive and weak, self-conscious about the birthmark on his face, Flory doesn’t have the courage to support his Indian friend, Dr. Veraswami, against his British colleagues. While the world has changed a lot since this book was written, I think the plight of this character remains something we can relate to.

      The other characters are not as complex, but extremely vivid. They include the scheming Burmese official U Po Kyn, the evil mastermind in the book, and Elizabeth, Flory’s love interest, a woman whom he idealises, but in reality is shallow and fickle. The other British colonials are prejudiced, selfish, and often hateful. Orwell portrays a world of corruption ...


      • Burmese Days by George Orwell
      and racism, which is bound to provoke indignation in the mind of a contemporary reader. It’s a world Orwell had experienced at first hand, and one can feel his bitterness.

      I found Burmese Days to be an easy read, albeit disturbing at times. The novel’s ending in particular is deeply affecting. Orwell’s writing is characteristically clear and easy flowing. Perhaps his descriptions of

      nature and Burmese society aren’t the stuff of greatness, but they don’t clog the prose and are interesting to the reader. One of the things I’ve enjoyed the most is the little bits of humour scattered here and there.

      Burmese Days is not a life-changing book in the way Animal Farm and 1984 can be, but it’s a really good novel nevertheless.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in March, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1731031456970531/k2311a0331/3.31.11
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