Corel Painter 11 software  » Software  »
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  • Brushes that I enjoy using are airbrush, pencils, pens, oil pastels, oil paints, artist paints, but I’ve also used chalk, marker, and crayon
  • If you’re not an artist, but you can take pictures at least fairly well, whether with your phone, digital camera or with an expensive fancy camera with multi-lens, then let me tell you how great Corel Painter 11’s clone feature is, which I love to use very much
  • As for me, I find enjoyment in learning how to use every style of art I can, and I’ve noticed some pretty exceptional pictures done using a Corel Painter and Adobe Photoshop combination, so I’d like to someday (soon) be able to invest in more than just a Photoshop 30 day trial, so that I can really learn how to use both

    • by K. Angel
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      I’ve been an artist all my life. From a very young age, my favorite thing to do was to take a box of crayons and color a page from a coloring book. When I was older, I moved on to using colored pencils. A big box of collected pencils and crayons turned into my very own treasure box.

      Pencil to paper was my joy, my pleasure. I didn’t think anything digital could compare. I’m going to speak to the hardcore traditionalists for a minute.

      Nothing is going to give you the enjoyment of the physical tools; whether pastel, pencil, oils, watercolor, or markers. Nothing can beat the real deal. But I’ve learned that paired with a Wacom Tablet, Corel Painter 11 is a powerful ally and new tool to add to the list.

      Much like a watercolor artist switching to oil or a colored pencil artist trying to use crayons, I had to relearn art on the computer. But after being patient enough to put in the time, energy and effort it takes to learn, I was greatly rewarded. The program has


      so many choices of brushes to choose from, and if used correctly they look authentic to real traditional art.

      Brushes that I enjoy using are airbrush, pencils, pens, oil pastels, oil paints, artist paints, but I’ve also used chalk, marker, and crayon. I enjoy experimenting with all of them so much that it puts my treasure box filled with crayons and colored pencils to shame. The possibilities are endless, and they become even more numerous once a choice of which artist tool is made.

      I prefer Camel brushes over fan brushes; dry brushes more than wet; cover pencils instead of mechanical, 2B or color. And I’m in love with the availability of colors, which are limitless!

      So I have to say, traditionalists: Corel Painter 11 broadens your ability to learn other techniques and if you’re a starving artist, it can be overall cheaper than having to spend the reoccurring payments for refills and replacements of used-up tools. (The full version costs only the one payment of $399, or you can upgrade from an earlier version for $199; unless, of course, you decide to upgrade to better editions in the future.

      ) ...


      • If you’re not an artist, but you can take pictures at least fairly well, whether with your phone, digital camera or with an expensive fancy camera with multi-lens, then let me tell you how great Corel Painter 11’s clone feature is, which I love to use very much. It lets you turn your photos into paintings, but you don’t have to be restricted to photos. I often clone pictures that I or my sister has done with the program, to test different effects or to try out different color styles.

        Another tool that I personally like to use is the tracing paper tool, which lets me toggle the tracing picture off and on whenever I need. It comes in handy when I’m tracing over my art to add something from one picture to another. My final conclusion on Corel Painter 11 is this: People (I’m the worst!) always try to compare Corel Painter 11 to the praised Adobe Photoshop, but it’s really not comparable since it’s actually geared to a totally different audience.

        So what I’ve

        finally decided is that if you’re a traditional artist looking into the digital art’s realm then Corel Painter, with its ability to make paintings and pictures look just like traditional art, should be your choice program to use. If you’re an aspiring digital artist who wants to work with traditional artist tools like paint, pastels, and pencils, then look into getting Corel Painter for its wide variety of brush types and techniques. If you’re a photographer who wants to make your work look like a painted masterpiece, then try out the 30-day demo of Corel Painter for its awesome cloning tool.

        If you mostly work with digital 3D renderings, or if you like to shape up photos with cool digital effects, then you should probably stick with Photoshop, as it’ll probably suit your tastes better. As for me, I find enjoyment in learning how to use every style of art I can, and I’ve noticed some pretty exceptional pictures done using a Corel Painter and Adobe Photoshop combination, so I’d like to someday (soon) be able to invest in more than just a Photoshop 30 day trial, so that I can really learn how to use both.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in March, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3010031442070431/k2311a0310/3.10.11
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