Atlantis (computer game)  » Games  »
3.5
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  • The game is played from a side-scrolling perspective, which is no problem, but I did find that there was a slightly distracting flashing from the left-hand side of the screen, which might have perhaps been avoided with better programming

    • by fredhound
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      Atlantis is a computer game for the Acorn range of BBC Micro systems, which was published by IJK Software. It’s probably roughly in the middle of their range as far as quality is concerned, being good enough to keep you playing for a while but not of the standard that makes you want to call out to your friends to come and see!

      Upon loading the game in from its floppy disk, the first thing you see is a rather garish and startling screen filled with the words “Battle of Atlantis” over and over again in bright, flashing letters which constantly change colour. This is quite a clever trick for this platform, and is presumably achieved by quickly switching


      the colour palette back and forth. In the background, a quite well composed but rather short snatch of Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture is played. I do think it’s rather a shame, actually, that more is not made of this, as it seems the perfect martial music for such a game.

      Assuming that you choose to view the instructions, you are then given a brief run-down of the background and object of the game. In essence, this is a futuristic war game, set in the year 2100, in which the ancient and drowned land of Atlantis has once again risen from the waves and is bent on the destruction of modern-day Europe. As the hero, your mission is to infiltrate the ...


      • Atlanteans’ underground defences, and destroy as much as you can of their infrastructure in order to weaken their power and lessen their assault on your own homeland. To do this you have been allocated five submarines; when they are gone, the game is over.

        Controlling the submarines is slightly, and interestingly, different from many games. You don’t have the usual options for movement and firing, but must instead choose from a selection of more specialized commands: stop, dash forward, rise to the surface, dive deep, drop a bomb or fire a torpedo. The keys are acceptably well chosen, at least assuming you are playing on a real BBC Micro (with its slightly non-standard key layout) rather than on a

        PC-based emulator, though it is still good to see that they can be customized to your personal tastes.

        Graphics and sound are workmanlike and acceptable rather than brilliant. The game is played from a side-scrolling perspective, which is no problem, but I did find that there was a slightly distracting flashing from the left-hand side of the screen, which might have perhaps been avoided with better programming. Sound effects are simple but effective, and on the harder levels especially (you can select from six) there is a satisfyingly frantic, urgent feel to things. It’s a shame that when you lose your last life nothing happens other than a return to the level select screen, but Atlantis is still a reasonably fun blaster.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2815021422850228/k2311a0215/2.15.11
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