Tomba (Game/PSX)
5.0
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  • There seemed to be so many games coming out that not only pushed the boundaries of what gamers thought they could do in their games, but really pushed the limits of creativity in order to create an experience that was different from anything else on the market at the time
  • The gameplay is definitely where this game became a classic, with its creative use of side scrolling physics and attention to quest based challenges and objectives that moved the story along
  • The best part about this is that the 3D never overpowers the 2D, it works only to compliments it both visually and through the gameplay

    • by Redeyedfacade
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      There was a time, maybe up until the early 00s or so, where game design seemed to be a contest over who could make the most original and fun game. There seemed to be so many games coming out that not only pushed the boundaries of what gamers thought they could do in their games, but really pushed the limits of creativity in order to create an experience that was different from anything else on the market at the time. It was really a second golden age, as creativity over sales potential seemed to be the order of the day, and all developers seemed to be on the same boat in that regard. Among the line of games that pushed the boundaries of creativity at that time was Tomba, a mostly two dimensional side scrolling game that had a very strong exploration and adventure element. The game was in

      2D, but retained a lot of 3D elements in order to make it through the levels. The graphics were colorful and distinct, really offering one of the most visually creative gaming experiences on the Playstation console. The gameplay is definitely where this game became a classic, with its creative use of side scrolling physics and attention to quest based challenges and objectives that moved the story along. From top to bottom, Tomba stands as one of the most creative games made in the last few decades.

      the graphics were visually stunning for their time, with a lot of colorful 3D elements populating a two dimensional landscape. There was nothing bland about it, everything from the animations to the landscapes seemed to get such a high level of detail put into them that it was mind blowing. It was really the complete package, when seen as a whole, that made you ...


      • feel like there was a greater plan for the art style of the game. Each piece of scenery was given the same amount of detail as the last, and while none of these pieces were particularly impressive by themselves, they all works seamlessly when taken as a whole.

        The gameplay was really where it was at in this game, and continues to offer an experience unlike anything that has been seen since. While the game runs in 2D, there are heavy 3D elements found throughout the game. The best part about this is that the 3D never overpowers the 2D, it works only to compliments it both visually and through the gameplay. The game opens up an area for you, and in this area can be found different challenges that can unlock all kinds of things, not least of which access to the next area. This kind of near open

        world 2D sidescrolling is something that has been rarely seen in the last decade, and Tomba really brought the mechanic to near perfection. Everything about how you run, jump, and perform actions works nearly perfectly, and grants you a very high level of control with which to achieve objectives. The gameplay, dare I say, is among the very best in the history of gaming, it is just that good.

        Tomba is a classic; a throwback to a time in gaming history when being more creative than other developers was more important than selling more games. Tomba is a testament to just how creative developers were in these days, as the joy of making games you wanted to play seemed to vastly outweigh the focus on sales potential. On its own, though, Tomba is a fantastic game with very little by way of flaws, and so much by way of ridiculous fun.



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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 289021417790328/k2311a029/2.9.11
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