Game: The Orange Box  » Games  »
4.5
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  • Each of these games is a First-Person-Shooter, and each has an amazing replay value
  • I enjoyed that a lot, because in some games I feel like I have absolutely no control over what I am doing, but in Half-Life 2 I get that freedom
  • You would think that this game would be pretty short and, while it is not as long as some games I would say it still has a good 20 or 30 hours of play time, especially when you consider all of the bonus tasks that you can complete
  • Even if you're a casual gamer, I guarantee you'll spend hours playing this game

    • by Evan_Dood
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      The Orange Box is a video game for the Xbox 360, a game whose main claim to fame was the fact that it was like 3 games for the price of 1. Well, I’m here to tell you that it’s like 5 games for the price of 1, and every single one of those games within the game is well worth the money! I am going to review each game within the Orange Box, but I’m going to make each one very short so that you’re not sitting here reading the whole thing for an hour.

      The games within The Orange Box (which costs roughly $30 in most places) are Half-Life 2, Half-Life 2: Episode 1, Half-Life 2: Episode 2, Portal, and Team Fortress 2. Each of these games is a First-Person-Shooter, and each has an amazing replay value.

      In Half-Life 2 and its sequels–episodes 1 and 2–you play the character Gordon Freeman, a nuclear physicist who narrowly escaped an inter-dimensional invasion at Black Mesa research facility a few years back. Black Mesa is sort of like the famous Area 51, and Gordon is one of the very few survivors of the catastrophic events that occurred in Half-Life 1, which now leaves the world in a police state. This is because one of the leaders of Black Mesa


      made a pact with the inter-dimensional beings to help them rule over the world. Now you, as Freeman, must escape capture and attempt to save the world.

      A bit much to take in, I’m sure. The game is quite well-rounded, and makes you feel as if the game isn’t forcing you down a corridor telling you where to go, but is rather hinting at where you should go. I enjoyed that a lot, because in some games I feel like I have absolutely no control over what I am doing, but in Half-Life 2 I get that freedom.

      The pros of this game: Great voiceovers A wonderful, original plot Smooth and easy to learn controls Great graphics–not as great as some of the top contenders, but still great

      The cons: It can be easy to get lost in the “free” landscape that I mentioned It can also be frustrating if you don’t know what you’re doing. It took me quite a while to figure out how to drive well in this game. The same goes for the boat.

      Other than those, this is a great part of the Orange Box!

      The fourth game in the box is Portal, a first-person-shooter-puzzle game that is somewhat linked into the Half-Life world. You start off as a cyborg-girl in a test chamber, and ...


      • spend the whole game going through a great number of trials run by the test’s controlling A.I., GLaDOS. You shoot portals out of your gun, one orange and one blue, and you use those portals to complete each task. Whether it be crossing an acid pool, getting a ball of energy into a hole, or simply pushing a button, you can use the portals to solve all of them. During the tests, GLaDOS offers encouragement–and discouragement in the form of humorous comments, such as “Way to go SUBJECT’S NAME HERE! You will be the pride of SUBJECT’S HOMETOWN HERE!” and “This next task is impossible. Do not even try.”

        I loved this game, almost as much as I loved Half-Life 2, if only for the humor. You would think that this game would be pretty short and, while it is not as long as some games I would say it still has a good 20 or 30 hours of play time, especially when you consider all of the bonus tasks that you can complete. This is a single player game, although I suppose you can compare your time trials with friends. The graphics are beautiful, the voiceovers are very well-done, and GLaDOS is actually a pretty cool character.

        Pros: Funny Great Graphics Good Voiceovers Replay Value Keeps you

        guessing

        Cons: Some of the challenges are hard?

        The final part of The Orange Box is Team Fortress 2, a strictly multiplayer game either online or through LAN (Local Area Network). This game is sort of like a cheesy cartoon in the form of a First Person Shooter. You can pick between 9 different characters, categorized into Offense, Defence, and Support. Each of these characters has a unique personality, weapons, accents, and abilities. You can play online with up to 16 players, 8 per team, in such typical game types as Capture the Flag, Control Points, and regular Arena/team deathmatch.

        The visual style of this game is original, to say the least. It’s much like a cartoon as I mentioned earlier, and the bright pastel-like colors are very easy on the eyes. I really enjoy playing this game for hours on end because there’s always somebody online. And if I get bored of playing with one character, there are 8 others to choose from! It may be challenging at first, but the controls are so simple and easy to get used to, so you don’t need to worry about that.

        Pros: Beautiful Funny Original Always fun to play

        Cons: Challenging at first Not many maps No single player or offline multiplayer mode.

        All of these games together make The Orange Box, a wonderful addition to any game library. Even if you’re a casual gamer, I guarantee you’ll spend hours playing this game!!




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2011. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2812011385200131/k2311a0112/1.12.11
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