The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time book  » Books  »
3.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • This is an amazingly interesting book, evolving around the protagonist ‘Christopher Boone’, a 15 year old boy, suffering from Autism
  • This is a hugely important fact to consider about the book, not only is it from a child’s perspective, but an autistic child, making it all the while more surreal for a general reader
  • The structure of the book, rather than the story, I found intriguing, as the first half was brilliant, utterly un put down able, what with the introduction of Christopher, his chapters all being prime numbers (as he finds security in maths, with only one right answer to go by), but I got near the end and had the impression that Mark Haddon didn’t really know how to end it
  • It was much like he had no choice in the way he had to have an ending, and that was the best he could come up with

    • by Joe Lamy
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      This is an amazingly interesting book, evolving around the protagonist ‘Christopher Boone’, a 15 year old boy, suffering from Autism. This is a hugely important fact to consider about the book, not only is it from a child’s perspective, but an autistic child, making it all the while more surreal for a general reader. It is the story of young Christopher, who can not tell a lie, and takes life very ‘black and white’, not understanding general turns of phrase, taking them literal rather than metaphorical. Life is both confusing and mysterious to Christopher, and becomes too much after he finds his neighbours dog dead. The story is his written exploration of his own feelings and experiences,

      encouraged by his teacher, from the point where he discovers the dead dog, ‘Wellington’ to the end where his childhood adventure ends. But as you get near to the end, you start to imagine how his life will plan out; he has always had constant supervision and care taken of him

      Because Christopher knows so little of the large world compared to other children his age, we see the effects of his own emotions and the intriguing adult world would be perceived and how they effect him more powerfully. He is a completely un-judgemental character, having no real perception of opinion, only the basic wrongs and rights that he was brought up with. His own feelings towards ...


      • his parents and other adult characters, and how they act is one of great confusion, as they were the ones who told him never to lie, whilst them themselves lie to make their lives easier; you told me not to do something, so why are you doing it? Christopher s completely logical and ordered, which as a reader we are able to see. We couldn’t live our lives like that, we have known better, but Christopher is trapped in his own bubble of Autism that he will never escape.

        The structure of the book, rather than the story, I found intriguing, as the first half was brilliant, utterly un put down able, what with the introduction of Christopher,

        his chapters all being prime numbers (as he finds security in maths, with only one right answer to go by), but I got near the end and had the impression that Mark Haddon didn’t really know how to end it. It was much like he had no choice in the way he had to have an ending, and that was the best he could come up with. As another writer, obviously not as acknowledged as Haddon, it is easy to empathise with this drawn out ending. Such a shame though, perfect beginning with an unfortunate end. Maybe a hidden metaphor for life; childhood starts wonderfully, care free and easy, only to end in a dark, responsible adult hood.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1731121372920231/k2311a1231/12.31.10
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy