Smithson Organics Pearl-white Teeth Whitening Powder  » Health  »
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  • I found a significant amount of information in the internet chronicling other people’s experiences about using household products to whiten teeth
  • If there’s one valuable factor, collectively, I’d definitely go with the seemingly organic scent of the powder and its light minty taste
  • So it was amazing to see the contrast between the two
  • I suggest you stop for a certain period to prevent the development of hypersensitivity and get back when the effect has worn out
  • As evidenced by my experience here, I’m confident to recommend this teeth whitening powder because it works


    • by jhunie

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      Should someone ask me what my most hidden insecurity is, I guess my teeth could very well be a valid answer. Teeth whitening may be a costly privilege accessible only at a dentist’s chair. I hated my personal orthodontist’s forceful attempts at coaxing me to avail his pricey services. I resorted to alternative methods. I found a significant amount of information in the internet chronicling other people’s experiences about using household products to whiten teeth. As a fruitful circumstance of researching while establishing a correspondence to some of them health buffs, I discovered this effective teeth whitening powder called Pearl-white by Smithson Organics.

      The organic powder works as a supplement for the teeth, focusing mainly on whitening, of course. Besides daily brushings, you can use it as a treatment once or twice a week by applying a layer of it around the teeth for 20 minutes. You don’t actually apply the product in its powder form, steps must be done to prepare the whitening powder and basically make a paste out from it – if you intend to use it as toothpaste. The process only requires water; I want it to be a little warm because my teeth are very sensitive to cold temperatures. If you’re a whiz at preparing pre-mixed pancakes, then it wouldn’t be as much of a challenge as simply mixing a bowl of batter. The paste is ready once the powder has turned starchy. Another hint could be the color of the powder, what once was white powder had turned into yellow – as in the hue of dry cottage cheese. I honestly had the impression


      that the outcome of that process was the least palatable by the looks of it, alone. It appeared curdy.

      I scoop the paste and brush as usual. The paste just spreads thinly inside the mouth, it seldom foams up. This is the part which I don’t personally enjoy. At least, with the self-prepared bleach, you can bump it with toothpaste so you brush your teeth the normal way. But after a culminating rinse, you notice a big change on the texture of your teeth, similar to the effect of getting your teeth scrubbed or irrigitated by a dentist. Well, peroxide is truly abrasive per se, so it’s normal to feel the surface of the teeth somewhat unnatural – you slide your tongue against the teeth and it doesn’t slide the way it used to. It’s comparable to the clean texture that follows right after you’ve finished gargling with a concentrated mouth wash. And relatively, it should be noted that oral cleansers contain traces of peroxide too.

      The powder resembles so much of raw baking powders or soda, and could easily be mistaken as such. The whitening powder in its initial state smells of lavender oil, yet it tastes like mint. The 2 elements don’t really go well together. The scent dies after water has been poured over the powder. I’d like to talk about the taste as well; it’s a very faint mint. For most of the duration, the paste actually tastes blah – just like water, as its consistency thins out while getting mixed with saliva. At the beginning, however, the paste coats the palate in a light ...


      • cool flavor, something peppermint and a tad sweet.

        The product says that most of the ingredients are organic. I pored through the short list on the box and in fact, it was made of simple derivative ingredients found in the kitchen, which gave the product a home-made quality. I wonder how they concocted hydrogen peroxide into powder form, perhaps they used the food-grade variety? I could certainly identify with such ingredients because I used to prepare my own do-it-yourself bleach by combining hydrogen peroxide and baking soda. So, I’d like to think that I’m merely reintroducing the bleaching agents to my teeth in what could possibly be an improved formula, while cutting down the hassles of preparation. If there’s one valuable factor, collectively, I’d definitely go with the seemingly organic scent of the powder and its light minty taste. They mask out very well the bitter taste of peroxide. I remember how peroxide used to taste like poison or a strong tingling chemical, and the way it accurately mimics the sensation of swallowing detergent as a child. But the bleaching powder counteracts that vomit-inducing scent, so it doesn’t taste as horrible as some antibiotics.

        It was hard to ascertain that the product really whitens in a week, since I didn’t abide the written instructions religiously. Instead, I just went by brushing with it every once in a while and used it as a treatment every week. I may have brushed roughly less than 3 times a week, but I made sure to perform the treatment in a consistent rhythm. After the third week, I started seeing positive results. My front teeth showed

        a greater amount of improvement than my coffee and tea stained molars, even so, the stains were fairly lighter. Then following a month of progress, I checked again and nearly all of the superficial part of my teeth revealed a pearly white glaze. However, it was truly superficial as the lighter shade of my bleached teeth covered mostly the front part, and the inner crevices of my teeth, still bore some of the stains. The result gradated from pearly white on front to a shade darker in the back, which was the natural shade of my teeth. So it was amazing to see the contrast between the two. I discontinued shortly once I began feeling sensitivity – my canine teeth would send a jolt of pain – though it wasn’t pain exactly. It happens when my teeth, lower and upper, would meet edge to edge. I don’t blame my sensitivity on account of this product, fully. It was another product. The sensitivity stopped, but was exacerbated by the use of another teeth whitening gel plus the growth of a wisdom tooth. I suggest you stop for a certain period to prevent the development of hypersensitivity and get back when the effect has worn out.

        As evidenced by my experience here, I’m confident to recommend this teeth whitening powder because it works. The product seems to pride its organic composition and costs a little much at 25 dollars. I suggest you don’t jump at it for 7 days, as it may cause shock to your teeth’s nerves. Just engage your teeth in it slowly. Contrary to what advertisers say – Life can wait, you know.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 3422121366781031/k2311a1222/12.22.10
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