Aiwa XR-M191 Micro Compact System (stereo package)  » Electronics  »
4.5
1 votes
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  • The model is aesthetically pleasing too, simple blue on silver plastic for the amp and finished wooden boxes with silver covers encasing the speakers-no attempts to make the unit look TOO futuristic (this model comes from around 2000 I believe) or unnecessarily HUGE like some boomboxs and home stereos, so it doesn't call unnecessary attention to itself or take up too much space
  • I would recommend this model to anyone in the market for a good little setup who doesn't mind settling for one on the (slightly) older side

    • by Nick Addison
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      I got my Aiwa XR-M191 from a friend who was no longer using it, having moved on to a bigger sound system, and I was relieved to have something to play my music through besides the pitifully weak built in speakers on my old PC laptop-but I wasn’t expecting much beyond a fair improvement in volume. So I was happily surprised by the simplicity of the unit’s interface and especially by the sound quality produced by its (relatively) small speakers, which is rich, dynamic and thankfully absent a built-in bass boost that would most likely end up producing more distortion than enhancement.

      The model is aesthetically


      pleasing too, simple blue on silver plastic for the amp and finished wooden boxes with silver covers encasing the speakers-no attempts to make the unit look TOO futuristic (this model comes from around 2000 I believe) or unnecessarily HUGE like some boomboxs and home stereos, so it doesn’t call unnecessary attention to itself or take up too much space.

      I’m personally more concerned with functionality when it comes to electronics-and the XR-M191 delivers here, including everything a music fan would want in a relatively inexpensive stereo. It plays tapes and CDs (including CD-Rs and CD-RWs), comes with a radio receiver, and perhaps most importantly, a ...


      • line-in input so the modern music lover can easily hook up an auxiliary RCA cord and play their iPod or computer through the system.

        There are drawbacks as well-the graphic equalizer on the unit doesn’t really live up to that title, since it doesn’t allow a range of control, but instead three presets to choose between. Regardless, the #1 priority for most listeners is obviously how good the speakers sound in general, and as I said, this system really does hold up in that department-I’ve played everything from classical music to hip-hop through the set and it’s all sounded great.

        I would recommend this model to

        anyone in the market for a good little setup who doesn’t mind settling for one on the (slightly) older side. Obviously true fanatics who would want features like a multiple-CD changer, a double tape deck for cassette-to-cassette dubbing, and perhaps Internet radio capability (and admittedly the radio on the unit doesn’t have as excellent reception as I would hope for) will have to continue the search, but in terms of the basics the average listener is after and the price (which I’ve averaged out online for getting it used, since I got mine free), I’d guess most would be extremely satisfied with this stereo, as I am.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 163121345940231/k2311a123/12.3.10
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