Little Women by Louisa May Alcott  » Books  »
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  • In relating different events in their lives, Alcott gave her readers moral lessons, explaining the best way for people to act when in difficult situations
  • When the girls took a day off, for no reason at all, Jo actually found she enjoyed performing her chores more than being lazy and reading all day
  • I recommend Little Women to all young women who enjoy reading

    • by Amor Fati
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      Over the past 22 years, I have heard and read Little Women by Louisa May Alcott four times. The first time, my mother read the novel to me, as my school required her to read something to me. I could hardly stand the novel. I vividly remember lying on the couch, wondering when the reading for the day would be over. In those days, I would rather have been living my own life than listening to the lives of four girls during the Civil War. My attitude didn’t change the first time I actually read the novel either. However, by the second and third readings, I grew to love the morality plays, the girls’ personalities, the lifestyle during those

      days, and the family and friends atmosphere Alcott portrayed.

      Alcott began her story, calling herself Jo, and the stories of her sisters, Meg, Beth, and Amy, with their father off fighting in the Civil War. In relating different events in their lives, Alcott gave her readers moral lessons, explaining the best way for people to act when in difficult situations. For example, Alcott gave two excellent examples from her childhood explaining why people should forgive and not be lazy. When Amy burned her writings, Jo initially refused to forgive her. Yet, Jo felt foolish and hardhearted when she nearly lost Amy in the frozen lake. When the girls took a day off, for no reason at all, Jo actually found ...


      • she enjoyed performing her chores more than being lazy and reading all day. From that day onward, she advocated keeping busy, and made a bit of a nuisance of herself I imagine.

        It seems like every event Alcott related is a morality play. Where some of the events require readers to use their analytical skills, other events state explicitly what Alcott was trying to portray. The reason Alcott wrote these morality plays is explained when Jo met Bhaer. The man she grew to love reprimanded her for writing simply for the sake of money. He encouraged her to write for educational purposes, for she had the ability. Evidently, she took his advice.

        To my embarrassment, I cry not only when Beth

        dies, but whenever I read parts where the love the sisters have for each other and their friends is felt beyond the pages. The familial love Alcott portrayed is rare these days. Possibly back in those days as well, I wouldn’t know. This love, along with the small romantic love scenes, may be the reason why the novel is so well cherished.

        The novel is compelling. When a little older, I had trouble putting the novel down, not matter what time of the day or night. The writing is generally easy enough to understand, and the transitioning from one event to another smooth. I recommend Little Women to all young women who enjoy reading. The morality plays are refreshing, and the stories inspirational.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1729111341900330/k2311a1129/11.29.10
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