Eat, Pray, Love Movie (2010)
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  • A girlfriend of mine had started reading the best-selling book upon which the movie was based
  • But, Julia Roberts just happens to be one of my favorite actresses, so I decided to see the film before the book, just this once
  • Some interesting tidbits and/or comments about her visits are as follows
  • This film is a bit on the preachy or philosophical side, but keeps the interest level high throughout the viewing experience

    • by c4collins
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      I must admit that I was pretty enthusiastic about purchasing tickets for the latest Julia Roberts flick, “Eat, Pray, Love”. A girlfriend of mine had started reading the best-selling book upon which the movie was based. She praised it highly and promised to loan it to me after finishing it. I usually like to read the book before seeing the film, as this makes me better appreciate both presentations. But, Julia Roberts just happens to be one of my favorite actresses, so I decided to see the film before the book, just this once.

      The movie is about one woman’s journey of re-discovering herself via a visit to three


      dynamic and unique countries: Italy, India and Bali. Naturally, a major, life-changing event prompts her to make this trip: a sudden and complicated divorce. This was the perfect part for this actress because it was fascinating to watch her seek God, enlightenment, and even meditate. She represents a part of all women-and men-that wish to improve both them and their surrounding world.

      Some interesting tidbits and/or comments about her visits are as follows: Italy has a ghetto and it resides in Sicily. But the food is heavenly, no matter where you go. The Italian people-including the children-are a tough but lovable set of individuals. I, along ...


      • with Julia’s character, learned a lot about the customs and cultures. India was exotic, impoverished, tiring, serene, depressing, hot and enchanting all at the same time. Although, visiting this country was not only integral to the plot but necessary for those viewing the movie to see a humble, thought-provoking side to this third-world country. The man from Texas who befriends Julia’s character should receive an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor. He physically resembles James Taylor and taught Roberts some life-altering lessons.

        Lastly, in the lush landscape of Bali, she actually pursues a romantic relationship. It’s as if the entire trip prepared her for what goes on in this

        country. She represents that time in a woman’s life (not necessarily in her twenties or even thirties) that is her very own prime. This fact is clear to see throughout the movie, as she flirts (both innocently and not-so-innocently) with men of all ages. I even felt sorry for the men – a truly beautiful woman can be a devastating heartbreaker, sometimes without even being aware.

        This film is a bit on the preachy or philosophical side, but keeps the interest level high throughout the viewing experience. The cinematography could have been a little better, especially for the sake of the audience as tourists. Other than that, this movie satisfied the soul.




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