“Stardust” by Neil Gaiman book
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  • I thought the tale of infatuation to be quite humorous and reminded me of my own stupidity at times and how a beautiful woman can make a young man do almost anything to gain her attention
  • I found it impossible not to like the bumbling Tristan, the uptight fallen star, or the lighting catching captain

    • by Ryan Carter
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      “Stardust” is a beautiful fairytale about the town of Wall in England, and a young boy on a journey into manhood. Many may know the story from a recent movie adaptation but would do well to give the book a thorough read through if for nothing other than a few hours spent as a wide eyed child in a world of wonder.

      I thought “Stardust” was one of the most moving tales that I had read in a long time. The story of Tristan is one that we can all sympathies with. It opens with the boy’s father taking


      a trip to the annual trading festival between his own world and that of the people across the wall. He meets a beautiful woman and fathers his child in a moment of heated passion.

      I should note, that while this may seem like a children’s story, several of the scenes in the book would best be read through before handing the book over to a younger audience. While it may read like a fairytale, Gaiman reminds us all that we are an adult audience with his language and description of sexual situations.

      The book comes back to Tristan’s own

      problems with wooing a girl and trying to one up her other heartless and overconfident suitor. Tristan finds from his father who he really is and takes a heartbroken trip across the wall to bring his prospective love a fallen star that she has requested for her hand in marriage. I thought the tale of infatuation to be quite humorous and reminded me of my own stupidity at times and how a beautiful woman can make a young man do almost anything to gain her attention.

      The star is actually a person who cannot be brought back, for ...


      her world is the world of imagination, and once across the wall she will be nothing more than a rock. Given such truth, one would think that Tristan would have his work made easy. But, with witches chasing the fallen star for her youth, feuding brothers chasing her for birthright, and Tristan lost in world with nothing more than chance and an ill used candle at his disposal, Gaiman takes us through a fast paced story that will make us all wonder at human emotions from greed to anger and power to true love.

      I found it impossible not

      to like the bumbling Tristan, the uptight fallen star, or the lighting catching captain. This story has something for anyone looking to tuck in a good read for a few hours and return to a state of wide eyed adolescence.

      Gaiman took me into a fairytale similar to when I was a child. I wanted a happy ending; I wanted to story to come out the way it was meant too. I found myself wanting to read a tale of hope and love and finding bliss is a short book dedicated to making me love the tales I worshipped as a child.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1728101310951131/k2311a1028/10.28.10
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