“American Gods” by Neil Gaiman book
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  • I thought it to be a calling to arms over the importance of preserving the stories of the past, no matter how fantastical or uncommon to our own
  • I particularly enjoyed the slew of new gods, in particular the gods of the modern day western world, including a pasty chubby boy that many will remind many of the modern idea of an obese gamer, and their arrogance to not understand that their time is limited
  • I found Gaiman’s book to be fun, interesting and little bit heartbreaking
  • It brought forth thoughts on how I should appreciate the traditions and religious views of the past, whether or not I agree with them
  • I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a great story that’s a little out there

    • by Ryan Carter
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      American Gods” is more than just a fairy tell set in the modern United States. I thought it to be a calling to arms over the importance of preserving the stories of the past, no matter how fantastical or uncommon to our own. Neil Gaiman gave me not only a great read, but a thought provoking, and often sad tale of how we push ideas that have provided us with so much joy and

      hope out into the cold.

      American Gods” is the story of a man nicknamed Shadow on a journey to help a semi-relevant God bring back stability to the world. It sounds over the top, and it is, but it’s a tale of ideas that have been lost to time, and the gods are a manifestation of our own needs who need us as much as we used to need them.

      I particularly enjoyed the slew of new gods, in particular the gods of the modern day western world, including a pasty chubby boy that many will remind many of the modern idea of an obese gamer, and their arrogance to not understand that their time is limited.

      It may take a little time for the reader to catch onto the plot, but once they do, they have a great story of war being raged for control over nothing but time. It’s ...


      a book that brings traditions of the old against our current wants and needs.

      I found Gaiman’s book to be fun, interesting and little bit heartbreaking. It brought forth thoughts on how I should appreciate the traditions and religious views of the past, whether or not I agree with them. I even had an ethical battle in my own head at the end of the book wondering whether or not my own personal needs for

      technology had given me a sort of religious reverence for physical needs.

      If there is an overall theme for this book, it is steeped in emotional needs versus physical wants. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a great story that’s a little out there. Even if some of the gods and traditions are unknown to readers, most will be able to recognize the gods of war, lust and even a very unlucky Leprechaun.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1728101310941131/k2311a1028/10.28.10
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