HP Pavilion dm3 netbook
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  • But I admit I'm not a fan of 13 inch portables, such as the Pavilion dm3, because my laptop is stuck in the office most of the time and I prefer the comfort of a larger screen and a more powerful processor
  • The disadvantage is the relatively high weight
  • Dm3 weighs about 1.9 kg, which is pretty much if we consider that we are dealing with an ultra portable
  • Writing on this keyboard is not a problem
  • In my opinion the HP Pavilion dm3 misses its targets by far

    • by Brock
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      As owner of an older model of HP Pavilion laptop I’ve used and tested this with the curiosity of a current and possible future buyer of this series and that is the HP Pavilion dm3. But I admit I’m not a fan of 13 inch portables, such as the Pavilion dm3, because my laptop is stuck in the office most of the time and I prefer the comfort of a larger screen and a more powerful processor. Let’s take a look at the construction of the HP Pavilion dm3. HP Pavilion dm3 has a very good overall construction giving you the sensation that we are talking about a very solid portable. There are no involuntarily moving parts or parts that sound dubious. The disadvantage is the relatively high weight. Dm3 weighs about 1.

      9 kg, which is pretty much if we consider that we are dealing with an ultra portable. The display measures 13. 3 inches and offers a resolution of 1366 x 768 pixels. There is nothing really important to say about the Pavilion dm3’s display, I would say that it


      is average neither good or bad. The keyboard type is a chicklet with normal sized keys, that are well spaced. Writing on this keyboard is not a problem.

      One problem is that some commands are placed on Fn. Among these functions (F1, F2 etc. ) and Page Up, Page Down. To close a program, for example, in addition to pressing the ALT + F4 buttons, you have to press Fn. And this compromise did not make me happy. The mechanisms for turning on the laptop and its wireless are interesting.

      There are some standard buttons, and some sliders placed on the extreme right which you have to pool fast. At first it seemed strange that approach, but soon I found them very comfortable. The touchpad itself is standard and does not raise any difficulty in use. I don’t have the same thing to say about the two buttons because they seemed to be too rigid. I found that they are easier to use when I am pressing closer to the exterior of the button, because their stiffness is felt especially when

      you press them in the center. HP Pavilion dm3 has no optical drive.

      Yes you heard that right there is no optical drive inserted in this portable. But HP saved the day with an external drive, that you will find in the package. Before we mention the performance of this laptop I have to say that it is equipped with an AMD central processor unit, and I was a bit concerned being used with the famous Intel Atom processors that proved their performances. The engineers from AMD recently thrown into the battle of low consumption processors the Neo K325 processor, that is a Dual-Core, which puts the HP Pavilion dm3 in motion. As you would expect an AMD central processor unit goes hand in hand with a video card provided by ATI. The video card is the ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5430 with a big chunk of memory of 512 MB DDR3.

      I was happy with the hard drive because it spins at 7200 rpm not 5400 rpm like other hard drives from the competition. A very useful and interesting ...


      • HP Pavilion dm3 netbook
      fact that I really appreciated about HP Pavilion dm3 is that depending on the software you use, it can make the transition from the dedicated video card to the integrated video card. Of course that all of these are done to obtain a higher battery life. As I said I had some concerns about the type of processor used in the HP Pavilion dm3, and I am sorry to say that my concerns came true. The processor really doesn’t deliver very good performances. From this point of view, is somewhere in the Intel Celeron Dual-Core SU2300 category, and some people might not like that, I certainly did not.

      At least I could watch a movie in 1080p format, while the CPU occupancy rate reached about 60% but that doesn’t make me any happier. When it comes to the autonomy, the HP Pavilion dm3 disappointed me again. I would have expected the HP Pavilion dm3 to last a lot longer. After all this is an ultra portable, that comes with a processor with low power consumption and an automatic video card

      switching system. All of these things gave me way higher expectations from what I was about to discover. Well let me say it straight, the autonomy is weak.

      I think that weak is a word too kind to describe Pavilion dm3’s autonomy. In office usage the battery lasted an astonishing three and a half hours. What does office usage mean, you may ask, well this involves: using the Microsoft office programs, surfing the web and listening to some music, not too much though. So now I hope that you can understand me why I’m not satisfied with the HP Pavilion dm3’s autonomy performance. After I fully charged the Pavilion dm3 I tried playing some movies in a 720p format and the dm3 lasted no longer than two hours and half. In my opinion the HP Pavilion dm3 misses its targets by far.

      Being an ultra portable, I can not complain too much about its performance. Instead, I really want to complain about the weight and its extremely modest autonomy. This especially given that many portables that are placed in this class offer better performance, greater autonomy, less weight.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 6315101298091131/k2311a1015/10.15.10
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