Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Nintendo Game Boy Advance)
3.5
1 votes
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  • I like playing through the levels because there are a number of platforming challenges and enemy placement generally makes navigating through levels safely a challenging task to an extent, but the previous video game in the series, Yoshi's Island
  • Despite my annoyance regarding Nintendo's underhanded tactics, I still enjoyed this video game
  • This is one of the few Mario platformers where I really feel like I'm going up against a vast army with an awesome arsenal and I found it to be great fun making my way past tanks and airships while dodging flamethrowers and bombs and more
  • Unfortunately though, this video game is more focused on going from point A to point B without getting killed in the process
  • It's basically the same experience and Nintendo didn't even bother spicing up the experience or expanding on what made the video game both fun and difficult in the first place


    • by CirclingCanvas

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      Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 is a video game for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance handheld. This is the fourth and final video game in the Super Mario Advance series. This video game originally appeared on the Nintendo Entertainment System as Super Mario Bros. 3. On the Game Boy Advance, the graphics and audio have all been updated, but the levels themselves pretty much remain the same. Some coins have been added here and there and some enemies have been replaced or rearranged, but for the most part, the video game on the Game Boy Advance is essentially the same video game on the Nintendo Entertainment System, only with a fresh coat of pain and better audio. In a way, Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 is a disappointment because the video game is pretty much unchanged from the console version that was released several years earlier. I like playing through the levels because there are a number of platforming challenges and enemy placement generally makes navigating through levels safely a challenging task to an extent, but the previous video game in the series, Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 3 at least added some extra bonus levels to

      play through that were both fun and difficult, truly testing a player’s skill and reflexes. This video game then comes along, and no extra levels? That was very disappointing. Now I’m aware that Nintendo sold some sort of e-Reader device and e-cards separately, and that extra levels could be unlocked that way, but that, to me, reeks of unfairness. Why should I have to buy a new device and new cards just to play extra levels that could have easily been programmed into the video game? That was Nintendo’s way of making extra money off of the customers, and I refused to play into their strategy.

      Despite my annoyance regarding Nintendo’s underhanded tactics, I still enjoyed this video game. Although this video game lacks the puzzle elements that Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 3 offered in combination with the traditional platforming and action elements, the actual difficulty present in the later levels that take place in Dark Land is really satisfying to overcome because there’s just so much going on on the screen. This is one of the few Mario platformers where I really feel like I’m going up against a vast army with an awesome arsenal and I found it to be great

      fun making my way past tanks and airships while dodging flamethrowers and bombs and more. The last world that I traverse through really does feel epic and intense. In earlier levels, there are a number of platforming challenges that can be tricky to overcome as some challenges involve bouncing from blocks over enemies or pitfalls while other challenges revolve around hopping from floating enemy to floating enemy. Plus, the way the enemies are placed throughout the levels can be intimidating and require careful timing, like with the pipes that house fireball spitting plants that are often times placed close together and near other enemies or obstacles. Unlike with Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World and Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 3, the levels do not house many secrets or secret areas, so there’s not much incentive to explore the levels, and that’s a shame. Plus, once a player becomes comfortable with the video game or has beaten it a few times, the player will likely start to realize just how short the levels actually are because he or she will be able to move through the levels faster. The levels may be full of obstacles and enemies in general, but the levels ...

      • Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Nintendo Game Boy Advance)
      themselves aren’t very long. Giving players incentive to look around in levels would have made the levels more fulfilling and exciting to play through. Unfortunately though, this video game is more focused on going from point A to point B without getting killed in the process. While that style can be exciting and challenging, the levels feel more empty as a result and are not as fun to look around in because there’s usually nothing to be found.

      Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 does have some interesting gameplay elements that other Mario games lack, such as the enemies that move around on the overworld map and sometimes must be engaged in combat, Toad Houses where items can be won and games can be played, blocked off areas that require a certain task be completed to gain access as well as a host of unique power-ups not found in other Mario video games. That being said, the bosses are generally pitiful and easily beaten within seconds and the levels are pretty short. The difficulty really ramps up later in the video game and I do think this is one of the more difficult two-dimensional side scrolling Mario adventure video games. The lack

      of new content though makes it very hard for me to recommend this video game to anyone that has already beaten or still owns a Nintendo Entertainment System and Super Mario Bros. 3. The e-Reader and e-Cards unlock extra levels, but come at an extra expense, and expense I wasn’t willing to accept. Thus, I’m rating this video game a “7″ due to its lack of new content, somewhat short levels that don’t feature any hidden surprises for the most part and easy bosses. The video game is challenging though and there’s a number of fun power-ups throughout the video game. The two-player mode is alright if you want to play with a friend, but consists of nothing more than taking turns. When originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System, Super Mario Bros. 3 featured numerous enemies that behaved different and required unique strategies to beat while challenging players with numerous platforming challenges, and that is all still true today, but I expected more from this port of the console version besides a graphics and visual upgrade. It’s basically the same experience and Nintendo didn’t even bother spicing up the experience or expanding on what made the video game both fun and difficult in the first place.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2811101292120731/k2311a1011/10.11.10
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