“Time for Grace”: a Christian romance novel by Kate Welsh
  • Yes, I like this book a lot, although I rebel a bit against the predictability
  • Yet, I also know that one of the reasons so many people read formulaic novels is the security they experience in knowing everything will work out in the end

    • by John Roper
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      Most of the romances I read (Yes, even I read romances occasionally) that are published under the Steeple Hill imprint of Harlequin books are mildly entertaining at best. Few are very thought-provoking, and only the extremely rare volume has any true depth to it. Therefore, I was pleasantly surprised to encounter an elusive gem in this genre with Kate Welsh’s “Time for Grace.” Although still formulaic due to the publisher’s guidelines, the story and insights are enough to make this book a recommended read.

      Grace is a micro-preemie, a premature baby so


      small that the regular rules for dealing with infants born too early are barely adequate. Sarah, her mother, is recently widowed and is angry at God for not only current events but also for the lack of her parents’ guidance and presence over the years due to their roles as missionaries. Enter Kip Webster, a pilot for Agape Air who is dealing with some fears and insecurities of his own. How the two protagonists resolve their inner conflicts and come to love is hardly innovative but still satisfying.

      What sets this book ...


      • apart for me, though, is the whole sub-theme of Sarah’s parents and the reasons for their mistreatment of their daughter. As a missionary of 20 years with five children and five countries in the process, I can relate to this story far more than is comfortable. Although we never chose to send our children packing to boarding school, I have known countless parents who have made that decision. In my role as teacher for many of those children, I have seen both the successes and failures of that choice. Kate Welsh
        has correctly identified one of the key failures of some missionaries and Christian workers who ignore the Bible’s teachings on family in favor of giving what they feel is their all for God.

        Yes, I like this book a lot, although I rebel a bit against the predictability. Yet, I also know that one of the reasons so many people read formulaic novels is the security they experience in knowing everything will work out in the end. I’m just glad that in this one there was some solid meat under all the sweet milk.

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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 178101289620131/k2311a108/10.8.10
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